Mechanical Complication Rates and Optimal Horizontal Distance of the Most Distally Positioned Implant-Supported Single Crowns in the Posterior Region: A Study with a Mean Follow-Up of 3 Years

Jae Hong Lee, Jong Bin Lee, Jung Im Park, Seongho Choi, Young Taek Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the 3-year mechanical complication rates of the most distally positioned implant-supported single crowns (ISSCs) in the posterior region, and how these complication rates are affected by several clinical factors (i.e., gender, mean age, horizontal distance [HD], position in the jaw, placement location, duration of functional loading, clinical crown-to-implant length ratio [C/I ratio], and crown height space of the implant). Materials and Methods: The mechanical complications (i.e., abutment screw loosening [ASL], abutment screw fracture [ASF], and ceramic fracture [CF]) associated with the implants were identified by examining the patients' treatment records, clinical photographs, and intraoral periapical radiographs. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square and Student's t-test to identify the relationship between various clinical factors and the mechanical complication rates. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was conducted to determine the optimal cut-off value for the HD between the most distally positioned ISSCs and the mesially adjacent natural tooth beyond which complications occur. Results: The study inclusion criteria were met by 183 patients who had undergone implant surgery in the period 2004 to 2011, involving a total of 221 implant treatments. Mechanical complications were present in 40 (18.1%) of the 221 investigated ISSCs. ASL was the most common complication (n = 28, 12.7%), followed in order by CF (n = 9, 4.1%) and ASF (n = 3, 1.4%). Repeated ASL and CF occurred in four (1.8%) and two (0.9%) implants, respectively. The mechanical complication rates differed significantly between implants with different HDs (p = 0.009) and clinical C/I ratios (p = 0.019); however, there was no significant association between the other clinical factors and the mechanical complication rates. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it appears that the incidence of mechanical complications is higher for the most distally positioned ISSCs in the posterior region than for those positioned at other sites. Furthermore, since the rate of mechanical complications increases with increasing HD, an HD of 3.7 mm or less is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-524
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Prosthodontics
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

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