Medical Drama Viewing and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors: Understanding the Role of Health Locus of Control Beliefs and Education Level

Sungsu Kim, Young Min Baek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study advances the understanding of how medical drama viewing influences healthy lifestyle behaviors (e.g., smoking, exercising, and consuming vegetables) by examining the role of the health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs and education level. An analysis of nationally representative data reveals that watching medical dramas is positively associated with chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. In addition, healthy lifestyle behaviors are positively associated with the internal HLOC belief and are negatively associated with the chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. Research findings demonstrate that there are indirect effects of medical drama viewing on these behaviors via chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. The indirect effect through the powerful others’ HLOC belief is also contingent on the education level. The implications for the role of HLOC beliefs and education level in terms of the effects of medical dramas on health-promoting behaviors are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-401
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Communication
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar 21

Fingerprint

Drama
Internal-External Control
locus of control
drama
Education
Health
health
education
Healthy Lifestyle
vegetables
health behavior
Vegetables
smoking
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

@article{8f5d78508d4943d3bfd02c78a8d53f63,
title = "Medical Drama Viewing and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors: Understanding the Role of Health Locus of Control Beliefs and Education Level",
abstract = "The present study advances the understanding of how medical drama viewing influences healthy lifestyle behaviors (e.g., smoking, exercising, and consuming vegetables) by examining the role of the health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs and education level. An analysis of nationally representative data reveals that watching medical dramas is positively associated with chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. In addition, healthy lifestyle behaviors are positively associated with the internal HLOC belief and are negatively associated with the chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. Research findings demonstrate that there are indirect effects of medical drama viewing on these behaviors via chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. The indirect effect through the powerful others’ HLOC belief is also contingent on the education level. The implications for the role of HLOC beliefs and education level in terms of the effects of medical dramas on health-promoting behaviors are discussed.",
author = "Sungsu Kim and Baek, {Young Min}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1080/10410236.2017.1405483",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "392--401",
journal = "Health Communication",
issn = "1041-0236",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medical Drama Viewing and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors

T2 - Understanding the Role of Health Locus of Control Beliefs and Education Level

AU - Kim, Sungsu

AU - Baek, Young Min

PY - 2019/3/21

Y1 - 2019/3/21

N2 - The present study advances the understanding of how medical drama viewing influences healthy lifestyle behaviors (e.g., smoking, exercising, and consuming vegetables) by examining the role of the health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs and education level. An analysis of nationally representative data reveals that watching medical dramas is positively associated with chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. In addition, healthy lifestyle behaviors are positively associated with the internal HLOC belief and are negatively associated with the chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. Research findings demonstrate that there are indirect effects of medical drama viewing on these behaviors via chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. The indirect effect through the powerful others’ HLOC belief is also contingent on the education level. The implications for the role of HLOC beliefs and education level in terms of the effects of medical dramas on health-promoting behaviors are discussed.

AB - The present study advances the understanding of how medical drama viewing influences healthy lifestyle behaviors (e.g., smoking, exercising, and consuming vegetables) by examining the role of the health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs and education level. An analysis of nationally representative data reveals that watching medical dramas is positively associated with chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. In addition, healthy lifestyle behaviors are positively associated with the internal HLOC belief and are negatively associated with the chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. Research findings demonstrate that there are indirect effects of medical drama viewing on these behaviors via chance and powerful others’ HLOC beliefs. The indirect effect through the powerful others’ HLOC belief is also contingent on the education level. The implications for the role of HLOC beliefs and education level in terms of the effects of medical dramas on health-promoting behaviors are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85034656567&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85034656567&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/10410236.2017.1405483

DO - 10.1080/10410236.2017.1405483

M3 - Article

C2 - 29166138

AN - SCOPUS:85034656567

VL - 34

SP - 392

EP - 401

JO - Health Communication

JF - Health Communication

SN - 1041-0236

IS - 4

ER -