Metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for synchronous colorectal neoplasm in patients with gastric neoplasm

Wan Park, Hyuk Lee, Eun Hye Kim, Ji Young Yoon, Jun Chul Park, Sung Kwan Shin, SangKil Lee, Yongchan Lee, Won Ho Kim, Sung Hoon Noh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aim: There are no data on how metabolic syndrome (MetS) affects the prevalence of synchronous colorectal neoplasm (CRN) in gastric neoplasm (GN) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate a model for risk stratification for colorectal screening by evaluating the clinical characteristics of synchronous CRN in GN patients classified according to the presence of MetS. Methods: A cross-sectional, case-control study of 492 patients (368 males and 124 females) with GN, and 492 age-matched healthy controls undergoing simultaneous upper endoscopy and colonoscopy, was conducted. Results: The GN group involved 446 patients without MetS, and 46 patients with MetS. In total, 177 (39.7%) and 28 (60.9%) synchronous CRN were detected in GN patients without MetS and with MetS, respectively (P=0.006). A total of 143 (34.7%) synchronous colorectal adenomas were detected in GN patients without MetS, whereas 17 (48.6%) were detected in GN patients with MetS (P=0.101), as well as more synchronous colorectal cancers (11.2% vs 37.9%, P<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of GN (OR=1.54, 95% CI: 1.18-2.00, P=0.001) and the presence of MetS (odds ratio=1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.19-2.78, P=0.006) were significant independent risk factors associated with the prevalence of CRN. The frequency of synchronous CRN in GN patients with MetS was 1.96 times greater than that in the GN group without MetS. Conclusion: The risk of synchronous CRN is significantly increased by the presence of GN, especially in MetS patients. Screening for synchronous CRN is highly recommended for GN patients with MetS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1490-1497
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
Volume27
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1

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Multiple Primary Neoplasms
Stomach Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Colonoscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Park, Wan ; Lee, Hyuk ; Kim, Eun Hye ; Yoon, Ji Young ; Park, Jun Chul ; Shin, Sung Kwan ; Lee, SangKil ; Lee, Yongchan ; Kim, Won Ho ; Noh, Sung Hoon. / Metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for synchronous colorectal neoplasm in patients with gastric neoplasm. In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia). 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 9. pp. 1490-1497.
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title = "Metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for synchronous colorectal neoplasm in patients with gastric neoplasm",
abstract = "Background and Aim: There are no data on how metabolic syndrome (MetS) affects the prevalence of synchronous colorectal neoplasm (CRN) in gastric neoplasm (GN) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate a model for risk stratification for colorectal screening by evaluating the clinical characteristics of synchronous CRN in GN patients classified according to the presence of MetS. Methods: A cross-sectional, case-control study of 492 patients (368 males and 124 females) with GN, and 492 age-matched healthy controls undergoing simultaneous upper endoscopy and colonoscopy, was conducted. Results: The GN group involved 446 patients without MetS, and 46 patients with MetS. In total, 177 (39.7{\%}) and 28 (60.9{\%}) synchronous CRN were detected in GN patients without MetS and with MetS, respectively (P=0.006). A total of 143 (34.7{\%}) synchronous colorectal adenomas were detected in GN patients without MetS, whereas 17 (48.6{\%}) were detected in GN patients with MetS (P=0.101), as well as more synchronous colorectal cancers (11.2{\%} vs 37.9{\%}, P<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of GN (OR=1.54, 95{\%} CI: 1.18-2.00, P=0.001) and the presence of MetS (odds ratio=1.82, 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.19-2.78, P=0.006) were significant independent risk factors associated with the prevalence of CRN. The frequency of synchronous CRN in GN patients with MetS was 1.96 times greater than that in the GN group without MetS. Conclusion: The risk of synchronous CRN is significantly increased by the presence of GN, especially in MetS patients. Screening for synchronous CRN is highly recommended for GN patients with MetS.",
author = "Wan Park and Hyuk Lee and Kim, {Eun Hye} and Yoon, {Ji Young} and Park, {Jun Chul} and Shin, {Sung Kwan} and SangKil Lee and Yongchan Lee and Kim, {Won Ho} and Noh, {Sung Hoon}",
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Metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for synchronous colorectal neoplasm in patients with gastric neoplasm. / Park, Wan; Lee, Hyuk; Kim, Eun Hye; Yoon, Ji Young; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, SangKil; Lee, Yongchan; Kim, Won Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon.

In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), Vol. 27, No. 9, 01.01.2012, p. 1490-1497.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for synchronous colorectal neoplasm in patients with gastric neoplasm

AU - Park, Wan

AU - Lee, Hyuk

AU - Kim, Eun Hye

AU - Yoon, Ji Young

AU - Park, Jun Chul

AU - Shin, Sung Kwan

AU - Lee, SangKil

AU - Lee, Yongchan

AU - Kim, Won Ho

AU - Noh, Sung Hoon

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N2 - Background and Aim: There are no data on how metabolic syndrome (MetS) affects the prevalence of synchronous colorectal neoplasm (CRN) in gastric neoplasm (GN) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate a model for risk stratification for colorectal screening by evaluating the clinical characteristics of synchronous CRN in GN patients classified according to the presence of MetS. Methods: A cross-sectional, case-control study of 492 patients (368 males and 124 females) with GN, and 492 age-matched healthy controls undergoing simultaneous upper endoscopy and colonoscopy, was conducted. Results: The GN group involved 446 patients without MetS, and 46 patients with MetS. In total, 177 (39.7%) and 28 (60.9%) synchronous CRN were detected in GN patients without MetS and with MetS, respectively (P=0.006). A total of 143 (34.7%) synchronous colorectal adenomas were detected in GN patients without MetS, whereas 17 (48.6%) were detected in GN patients with MetS (P=0.101), as well as more synchronous colorectal cancers (11.2% vs 37.9%, P<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of GN (OR=1.54, 95% CI: 1.18-2.00, P=0.001) and the presence of MetS (odds ratio=1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.19-2.78, P=0.006) were significant independent risk factors associated with the prevalence of CRN. The frequency of synchronous CRN in GN patients with MetS was 1.96 times greater than that in the GN group without MetS. Conclusion: The risk of synchronous CRN is significantly increased by the presence of GN, especially in MetS patients. Screening for synchronous CRN is highly recommended for GN patients with MetS.

AB - Background and Aim: There are no data on how metabolic syndrome (MetS) affects the prevalence of synchronous colorectal neoplasm (CRN) in gastric neoplasm (GN) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate a model for risk stratification for colorectal screening by evaluating the clinical characteristics of synchronous CRN in GN patients classified according to the presence of MetS. Methods: A cross-sectional, case-control study of 492 patients (368 males and 124 females) with GN, and 492 age-matched healthy controls undergoing simultaneous upper endoscopy and colonoscopy, was conducted. Results: The GN group involved 446 patients without MetS, and 46 patients with MetS. In total, 177 (39.7%) and 28 (60.9%) synchronous CRN were detected in GN patients without MetS and with MetS, respectively (P=0.006). A total of 143 (34.7%) synchronous colorectal adenomas were detected in GN patients without MetS, whereas 17 (48.6%) were detected in GN patients with MetS (P=0.101), as well as more synchronous colorectal cancers (11.2% vs 37.9%, P<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of GN (OR=1.54, 95% CI: 1.18-2.00, P=0.001) and the presence of MetS (odds ratio=1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.19-2.78, P=0.006) were significant independent risk factors associated with the prevalence of CRN. The frequency of synchronous CRN in GN patients with MetS was 1.96 times greater than that in the GN group without MetS. Conclusion: The risk of synchronous CRN is significantly increased by the presence of GN, especially in MetS patients. Screening for synchronous CRN is highly recommended for GN patients with MetS.

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