Methodology to set up nozzle-to-substrate gap for high resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

Jaehong Park, Ji Woon Park, Ali Mohamadi Nasrabadi, Jungho Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several efforts have been made for the prediction of jet diameter in electrohydrodynamic jet printing; however, not much attention has been paid to the jet length, which is the distance from the cone apex to the location where the jet is unstable and is broken into atomized droplets. In this study, we measured both the cone length and the jet length using a high-speed camera, and measured the line pattern width with an optical microscope to investigate the effects of cone length and jet length on the pattern quality. Measurements were carried out with variations in nozzle diameter, flow rate, and applied voltage. The pattern width was theoretically predicted for the case when the nozzle-to-substrate distance was more than the cone length, and smaller than the summation of the cone and jet lengths (which is the case when there is no jet breakup).

Original languageEnglish
Article number134104
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume109
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 26

Fingerprint

electrohydrodynamics
printing
nozzles
methodology
high resolution
cones
high speed cameras
optical microscopes
apexes
flow velocity
electric potential
predictions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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abstract = "Several efforts have been made for the prediction of jet diameter in electrohydrodynamic jet printing; however, not much attention has been paid to the jet length, which is the distance from the cone apex to the location where the jet is unstable and is broken into atomized droplets. In this study, we measured both the cone length and the jet length using a high-speed camera, and measured the line pattern width with an optical microscope to investigate the effects of cone length and jet length on the pattern quality. Measurements were carried out with variations in nozzle diameter, flow rate, and applied voltage. The pattern width was theoretically predicted for the case when the nozzle-to-substrate distance was more than the cone length, and smaller than the summation of the cone and jet lengths (which is the case when there is no jet breakup).",
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Methodology to set up nozzle-to-substrate gap for high resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing. / Park, Jaehong; Park, Ji Woon; Nasrabadi, Ali Mohamadi; Hwang, Jungho.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 109, No. 13, 134104, 26.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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