Mix-and-Read No-Wash Fluorescence DNA Sensing System Using Graphene Oxide: Analytical Performance of Fresh Versus Aged Dispersions

C. Lorena Manzanares Palenzuela, Amir Masoud Pourrahimi, Zdeněk Sofer, Martin Pumera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Simple and sensitive assays for DNA detection still represent a highly pursued research area with important implications in biomedical-related sciences. Graphene oxide (GO) is a highly efficient quenching platform for fluorophore-tagged DNA, which is why its use for fluorescent sensing has been widespread over the past decade. GO-based biosensing systems frequently rely upon the isolation of biomolecule-material complexes prior to detection via hybridization-induced desorption of the fluorescent dye. Simple mix-and-read detection formats that do not require purification/isolation/wash steps are envisioned as promising schemes for decentralized analysis, with potential for commercial scalability. For GO-based mix-and-read assays, the aging process of the quenching material in aqueous media can be a crucial parameter affecting the analytical performance, which has so far not been addressed in the literature. To get this goal, top-down characterization microstructures to atomic levels is needed. Herein, we revisit GO as a well-known quenching system, aiming at a centrifugation-free, mix-and-read, no-wash format, toward the detection of an apolipoprotein-E-encoding DNA sequence as a model analyte. We look into the progression of GO aging in water medium through a top-down characterization and investigate the analytical performance of fresh versus aged dispersions in terms of hybridization-based detection. We found that aged GO, while still retaining a high quenching efficiency, undergoes morphological changes over time with concomitant detrimental effects on its analytical performance toward DNA detection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1611-1616
Number of pages6
JournalACS Omega
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 18

Fingerprint

Graphite
Dispersions
Oxides
Graphene
DNA
Fluorescence
Quenching
Assays
Aging of materials
Centrifugation
Fluorophores
DNA sequences
Biomolecules
Apolipoproteins E
Fluorescent Dyes
Purification
Scalability
Desorption
Dyes
Microstructure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Manzanares Palenzuela, C. Lorena ; Pourrahimi, Amir Masoud ; Sofer, Zdeněk ; Pumera, Martin. / Mix-and-Read No-Wash Fluorescence DNA Sensing System Using Graphene Oxide : Analytical Performance of Fresh Versus Aged Dispersions. In: ACS Omega. 2019 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 1611-1616.
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Mix-and-Read No-Wash Fluorescence DNA Sensing System Using Graphene Oxide : Analytical Performance of Fresh Versus Aged Dispersions. / Manzanares Palenzuela, C. Lorena; Pourrahimi, Amir Masoud; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin.

In: ACS Omega, Vol. 4, No. 1, 18.01.2019, p. 1611-1616.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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