Motor Cerebellar Connectivity and Future Development of Freezing of Gait in De Novo Parkinson's Disease

Jin Ho Jung, Bo Hyun Kim, Seok Jong Chung, Han Soo Yoo, Yang Hyun Lee, Kyoungwon Baik, Byoung Seok Ye, Young H. Sohn, Jong Min Lee, Phil Hyu Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the role of motor cerebellar connectivity in future development of freezing of gait, because it is a complex network disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: We recruited 26 de novo patients with PD who experienced freezing of gait within 5 years from magnetic resonance imaging acquisition (vulnerable PD group), 61 patients with PD who had not experienced freezing of gait within 5 years (resistant PD group), and 27 healthy control subjects. We compared the resting state functional connectivity between the motor cerebellum and the whole brain between the groups. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between motor cerebellar connectivity and freezing of gait latency. Results: The vulnerable PD group had increased functional connectivity between the motor cerebellum and parieto-occipito-temporal association cortices compared with the control group or the resistant PD group. Connectivity between lobule VI and the right superior parietal lobule, right fusiform gyrus, and left inferior temporal gyrus; between lobule VIIb and the right superior parietal lobule, right hippocampus, and right middle temporal gyrus; and between lobule VIIIb and the bilateral fusiform gyri, right middle occipital gyrus, and bilateral parietal lobes was inversely proportional to freezing of gait latency. The freezing of gait latency-related cortical functional connectivity from the motor cerebellum was also significantly higher in the vulnerable PD group compared with the control group, as well as the resistant PD group. Conclusions: The data suggest that the motor cerebellar functional connectivity with the posterior cortical areas play an important role in future development of freezing of gait in PD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMovement Disorders
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Motor Cerebellar Connectivity and Future Development of Freezing of Gait in De Novo Parkinson's Disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this