Multi-institution, prospective, randomized trial to compare the success rates of single-port versus multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy for the treatment of uterine myoma or adenomyosis

Tae Joong Kim, So Jin Shin, Tae Hyun Kim, Chi Heum Cho, Sang Hoon Kwon, Seok Ju Sung, Taejong Song, Sooyoung Hur, Yong Man Kim, Shin Wha Lee, Young Tae Kim, Eun Ji Nam, Yong Beom Kim, Jung Ryeol Lee, Hyun Jin Roh, Hyewon Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare the operative outcomes of patients undergoing either single-port or multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH). METHODS: Two hundred fifty-six women scheduled for LH for symptomatic myoma and/or adenomyosis from 8 tertiary teaching hospitals were randomized to single-port or multiport groups. Primary outcome was conversion and/or complication proportion of the planned procedure to determine whether the success proportion of the single-port approach was not inferior to that of the multiport approach. Secondary outcomes were postoperative pain and operative scar. RESULTS: Demographic parameters including age, body mass index, parity, and history of vaginal and cesarean delivery were comparable between the 2 groups. The primary outcome of a combined conversion and/or complication rate was similar between the single-port and multiport groups at 8% and 10.3%, respectively. Conversions were similar between the groups with 4% of single-port cases and.8% of multiport cases. Transfusions were the most frequent complication required in 4.0% of single-port cases and 7.9% of multiport cases, with no difference between the groups. Concerning secondary outcomes, postoperative pain score and patient and observer scar assessment were not different between the 2 groups. Although not a specific outcome measure, there was no difference between the groups in blood loss, operative time, and postoperative hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Single-port LH is not inferior to multiport LH in terms of conversion and/or complications rates, including transfusion. However, the single-port approach did not have any advantage over multiport LH with regard to pain or cosmetic outcomes. These findings were demonstrated by multi-institutional surgeons in Korea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)785-791
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 14

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Adenomyosis
Myoma
Hysterectomy
Postoperative Pain
Cicatrix
Therapeutics
Korea
Operative Time
Blood Group Antigens
Parity
Tertiary Care Centers
Cosmetics
Teaching Hospitals
Length of Stay
Body Mass Index
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Kim, Tae Joong ; Shin, So Jin ; Kim, Tae Hyun ; Cho, Chi Heum ; Kwon, Sang Hoon ; Sung, Seok Ju ; Song, Taejong ; Hur, Sooyoung ; Kim, Yong Man ; Lee, Shin Wha ; Kim, Young Tae ; Nam, Eun Ji ; Kim, Yong Beom ; Lee, Jung Ryeol ; Roh, Hyun Jin ; Chung, Hyewon. / Multi-institution, prospective, randomized trial to compare the success rates of single-port versus multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy for the treatment of uterine myoma or adenomyosis. In: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. 2015 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 785-791.
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abstract = "STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare the operative outcomes of patients undergoing either single-port or multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH). METHODS: Two hundred fifty-six women scheduled for LH for symptomatic myoma and/or adenomyosis from 8 tertiary teaching hospitals were randomized to single-port or multiport groups. Primary outcome was conversion and/or complication proportion of the planned procedure to determine whether the success proportion of the single-port approach was not inferior to that of the multiport approach. Secondary outcomes were postoperative pain and operative scar. RESULTS: Demographic parameters including age, body mass index, parity, and history of vaginal and cesarean delivery were comparable between the 2 groups. The primary outcome of a combined conversion and/or complication rate was similar between the single-port and multiport groups at 8{\%} and 10.3{\%}, respectively. Conversions were similar between the groups with 4{\%} of single-port cases and.8{\%} of multiport cases. Transfusions were the most frequent complication required in 4.0{\%} of single-port cases and 7.9{\%} of multiport cases, with no difference between the groups. Concerning secondary outcomes, postoperative pain score and patient and observer scar assessment were not different between the 2 groups. Although not a specific outcome measure, there was no difference between the groups in blood loss, operative time, and postoperative hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Single-port LH is not inferior to multiport LH in terms of conversion and/or complications rates, including transfusion. However, the single-port approach did not have any advantage over multiport LH with regard to pain or cosmetic outcomes. These findings were demonstrated by multi-institutional surgeons in Korea.",
author = "Kim, {Tae Joong} and Shin, {So Jin} and Kim, {Tae Hyun} and Cho, {Chi Heum} and Kwon, {Sang Hoon} and Sung, {Seok Ju} and Taejong Song and Sooyoung Hur and Kim, {Yong Man} and Lee, {Shin Wha} and Kim, {Young Tae} and Nam, {Eun Ji} and Kim, {Yong Beom} and Lee, {Jung Ryeol} and Roh, {Hyun Jin} and Hyewon Chung",
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Multi-institution, prospective, randomized trial to compare the success rates of single-port versus multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy for the treatment of uterine myoma or adenomyosis. / Kim, Tae Joong; Shin, So Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Chi Heum; Kwon, Sang Hoon; Sung, Seok Ju; Song, Taejong; Hur, Sooyoung; Kim, Yong Man; Lee, Shin Wha; Kim, Young Tae; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Yong Beom; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Roh, Hyun Jin; Chung, Hyewon.

In: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology, Vol. 22, No. 5, 14.01.2015, p. 785-791.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multi-institution, prospective, randomized trial to compare the success rates of single-port versus multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy for the treatment of uterine myoma or adenomyosis

AU - Kim, Tae Joong

AU - Shin, So Jin

AU - Kim, Tae Hyun

AU - Cho, Chi Heum

AU - Kwon, Sang Hoon

AU - Sung, Seok Ju

AU - Song, Taejong

AU - Hur, Sooyoung

AU - Kim, Yong Man

AU - Lee, Shin Wha

AU - Kim, Young Tae

AU - Nam, Eun Ji

AU - Kim, Yong Beom

AU - Lee, Jung Ryeol

AU - Roh, Hyun Jin

AU - Chung, Hyewon

PY - 2015/1/14

Y1 - 2015/1/14

N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare the operative outcomes of patients undergoing either single-port or multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH). METHODS: Two hundred fifty-six women scheduled for LH for symptomatic myoma and/or adenomyosis from 8 tertiary teaching hospitals were randomized to single-port or multiport groups. Primary outcome was conversion and/or complication proportion of the planned procedure to determine whether the success proportion of the single-port approach was not inferior to that of the multiport approach. Secondary outcomes were postoperative pain and operative scar. RESULTS: Demographic parameters including age, body mass index, parity, and history of vaginal and cesarean delivery were comparable between the 2 groups. The primary outcome of a combined conversion and/or complication rate was similar between the single-port and multiport groups at 8% and 10.3%, respectively. Conversions were similar between the groups with 4% of single-port cases and.8% of multiport cases. Transfusions were the most frequent complication required in 4.0% of single-port cases and 7.9% of multiport cases, with no difference between the groups. Concerning secondary outcomes, postoperative pain score and patient and observer scar assessment were not different between the 2 groups. Although not a specific outcome measure, there was no difference between the groups in blood loss, operative time, and postoperative hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Single-port LH is not inferior to multiport LH in terms of conversion and/or complications rates, including transfusion. However, the single-port approach did not have any advantage over multiport LH with regard to pain or cosmetic outcomes. These findings were demonstrated by multi-institutional surgeons in Korea.

AB - STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare the operative outcomes of patients undergoing either single-port or multiport laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH). METHODS: Two hundred fifty-six women scheduled for LH for symptomatic myoma and/or adenomyosis from 8 tertiary teaching hospitals were randomized to single-port or multiport groups. Primary outcome was conversion and/or complication proportion of the planned procedure to determine whether the success proportion of the single-port approach was not inferior to that of the multiport approach. Secondary outcomes were postoperative pain and operative scar. RESULTS: Demographic parameters including age, body mass index, parity, and history of vaginal and cesarean delivery were comparable between the 2 groups. The primary outcome of a combined conversion and/or complication rate was similar between the single-port and multiport groups at 8% and 10.3%, respectively. Conversions were similar between the groups with 4% of single-port cases and.8% of multiport cases. Transfusions were the most frequent complication required in 4.0% of single-port cases and 7.9% of multiport cases, with no difference between the groups. Concerning secondary outcomes, postoperative pain score and patient and observer scar assessment were not different between the 2 groups. Although not a specific outcome measure, there was no difference between the groups in blood loss, operative time, and postoperative hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Single-port LH is not inferior to multiport LH in terms of conversion and/or complications rates, including transfusion. However, the single-port approach did not have any advantage over multiport LH with regard to pain or cosmetic outcomes. These findings were demonstrated by multi-institutional surgeons in Korea.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jmig.2015.02.022

DO - 10.1016/j.jmig.2015.02.022

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JO - Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology

JF - Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology

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