Mussel-inspired cell-adhesion peptide modification for enhanced endothelialization of decellularized blood vessels

Jung Seung Lee, Kihong Lee, Sung Hwan Moon, Hyung Min Chung, Jun Hyup Lee, Soong Ho Um, Dong Ik Kim, Seung-Woo Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enhanced endothelialization of tissue-engineered blood vessels is essential for vascular regeneration and function of engineered vessels. In this study, mussel-inspired surface chemistry of polydopamine (pDA) coatings are applied to functionalize decellularized vein matrix (DVM) with extracellular matrix-derived cell adhesion peptides (RGD and YIGSR). DVMs engineered with pDA-peptides enhance focal adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from cord blood and embryonic stem cells compared with EPCs on non-coated or pDA-coated DVMs. These results indicate that pDA-peptide functionalization may contribute to enhanced, rapid endothelialization of DVM surfaces by promoting adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of circulating EPCs. Ultimately, this approach may be useful for improving in vivo patency and function of decellularized matrix-based blood vessels. Mussel-inspired catechol functionalization by polydopamine coating leads to efficient immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on decellularized blood vessel matrices. Peptide modification promotes adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells, which ultimately facilitates endothelialization of the decellularized matrices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1181-1189
Number of pages9
JournalMacromolecular Bioscience
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Bivalvia
Cell adhesion
Blood vessels
Cell Adhesion
Peptides
Blood Vessels
Endothelial cells
Digital voltmeters
Adhesion
tyrosyl-isoleucyl-glycyl-seryl-arginine
Veins
Focal Adhesions
Coatings
Embryonic Stem Cells
Fetal Blood
Immobilization
Extracellular Matrix
Regeneration
Surface chemistry
Stem cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Lee, Jung Seung ; Lee, Kihong ; Moon, Sung Hwan ; Chung, Hyung Min ; Lee, Jun Hyup ; Um, Soong Ho ; Kim, Dong Ik ; Cho, Seung-Woo. / Mussel-inspired cell-adhesion peptide modification for enhanced endothelialization of decellularized blood vessels. In: Macromolecular Bioscience. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 8. pp. 1181-1189.
@article{92a1c36b77bc434dbde432c6247f7755,
title = "Mussel-inspired cell-adhesion peptide modification for enhanced endothelialization of decellularized blood vessels",
abstract = "Enhanced endothelialization of tissue-engineered blood vessels is essential for vascular regeneration and function of engineered vessels. In this study, mussel-inspired surface chemistry of polydopamine (pDA) coatings are applied to functionalize decellularized vein matrix (DVM) with extracellular matrix-derived cell adhesion peptides (RGD and YIGSR). DVMs engineered with pDA-peptides enhance focal adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from cord blood and embryonic stem cells compared with EPCs on non-coated or pDA-coated DVMs. These results indicate that pDA-peptide functionalization may contribute to enhanced, rapid endothelialization of DVM surfaces by promoting adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of circulating EPCs. Ultimately, this approach may be useful for improving in vivo patency and function of decellularized matrix-based blood vessels. Mussel-inspired catechol functionalization by polydopamine coating leads to efficient immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on decellularized blood vessel matrices. Peptide modification promotes adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells, which ultimately facilitates endothelialization of the decellularized matrices.",
author = "Lee, {Jung Seung} and Kihong Lee and Moon, {Sung Hwan} and Chung, {Hyung Min} and Lee, {Jun Hyup} and Um, {Soong Ho} and Kim, {Dong Ik} and Seung-Woo Cho",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/mabi.201400052",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "1181--1189",
journal = "Macromolecular Bioscience",
issn = "1616-5187",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "8",

}

Mussel-inspired cell-adhesion peptide modification for enhanced endothelialization of decellularized blood vessels. / Lee, Jung Seung; Lee, Kihong; Moon, Sung Hwan; Chung, Hyung Min; Lee, Jun Hyup; Um, Soong Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Cho, Seung-Woo.

In: Macromolecular Bioscience, Vol. 14, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 1181-1189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mussel-inspired cell-adhesion peptide modification for enhanced endothelialization of decellularized blood vessels

AU - Lee, Jung Seung

AU - Lee, Kihong

AU - Moon, Sung Hwan

AU - Chung, Hyung Min

AU - Lee, Jun Hyup

AU - Um, Soong Ho

AU - Kim, Dong Ik

AU - Cho, Seung-Woo

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Enhanced endothelialization of tissue-engineered blood vessels is essential for vascular regeneration and function of engineered vessels. In this study, mussel-inspired surface chemistry of polydopamine (pDA) coatings are applied to functionalize decellularized vein matrix (DVM) with extracellular matrix-derived cell adhesion peptides (RGD and YIGSR). DVMs engineered with pDA-peptides enhance focal adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from cord blood and embryonic stem cells compared with EPCs on non-coated or pDA-coated DVMs. These results indicate that pDA-peptide functionalization may contribute to enhanced, rapid endothelialization of DVM surfaces by promoting adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of circulating EPCs. Ultimately, this approach may be useful for improving in vivo patency and function of decellularized matrix-based blood vessels. Mussel-inspired catechol functionalization by polydopamine coating leads to efficient immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on decellularized blood vessel matrices. Peptide modification promotes adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells, which ultimately facilitates endothelialization of the decellularized matrices.

AB - Enhanced endothelialization of tissue-engineered blood vessels is essential for vascular regeneration and function of engineered vessels. In this study, mussel-inspired surface chemistry of polydopamine (pDA) coatings are applied to functionalize decellularized vein matrix (DVM) with extracellular matrix-derived cell adhesion peptides (RGD and YIGSR). DVMs engineered with pDA-peptides enhance focal adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from cord blood and embryonic stem cells compared with EPCs on non-coated or pDA-coated DVMs. These results indicate that pDA-peptide functionalization may contribute to enhanced, rapid endothelialization of DVM surfaces by promoting adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of circulating EPCs. Ultimately, this approach may be useful for improving in vivo patency and function of decellularized matrix-based blood vessels. Mussel-inspired catechol functionalization by polydopamine coating leads to efficient immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on decellularized blood vessel matrices. Peptide modification promotes adhesion, metabolic activity, and endothelial differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells, which ultimately facilitates endothelialization of the decellularized matrices.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906315910&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906315910&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/mabi.201400052

DO - 10.1002/mabi.201400052

M3 - Article

C2 - 24831738

AN - SCOPUS:84906315910

VL - 14

SP - 1181

EP - 1189

JO - Macromolecular Bioscience

JF - Macromolecular Bioscience

SN - 1616-5187

IS - 8

ER -