N-gram measures and L2 writing proficiency

James Garner, Scott Crossley, Kristopher Kyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Productive knowledge of English phraseology can assist second language writers in composing more effective and target-like texts. As such, researchers have taken a great interest in L2 phraseological competence by comparing the use of multi-word sequences by L2 writers with that of native speakers as well as comparing the use of multi-word sequences of L2 writers from different proficiency levels. This study expands on this research by investigating how multi-word sequence use can predict human judgments of writing proficiency using a multi-faceted approach. The study specifically examines multiple indices of bigrams and trigram use (frequency, range, association strength) in a corpus of English placement test essays written by L1 Korean learners of English. Results of the multiple regression revealed that n-gram proportion and association strength measures were predictive of human judgments of writing proficiency, indicating that higher rated essays include more strongly associated academic bigrams, a greater proportion of frequent academic trigrams, and more strongly associated spoken trigrams. These results highlight the importance of including instruction on multi-word sequences in the second language writing classroom.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)176-187
Number of pages12
JournalSystem
Volume80
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb

Fingerprint

writer
language
instruction
regression
classroom
N-gram
L2 Writing
Writing Proficiency
Writer
Trigram
Proportion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Garner, James ; Crossley, Scott ; Kyle, Kristopher. / N-gram measures and L2 writing proficiency. In: System. 2019 ; Vol. 80. pp. 176-187.
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N-gram measures and L2 writing proficiency. / Garner, James; Crossley, Scott; Kyle, Kristopher.

In: System, Vol. 80, 02.2019, p. 176-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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