Nanoparticle interaction with biological membranes: Does nanotechnology present a janus face?

Pascale R. Leroueil, Seungpyo Hong, Almut Mecke, James R. Baker, Bradford G. Orr, Mark M.Banaszak Holl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Polycationic organic nanoparticles are shown to disrupt model biological membranes and living cell membranes at nanomolar concentrations. The degree of disruption is shown to be related to nanoparticle size and charge, as well as to the phase-fluid, liquid crystalline, or gel-of the biological membrane. Disruption events on model membranes have been directly imaged using scanning probe microsopy, whereas disruption events on living cells have been analyzed using cytosolic enzyme leakage assays, dye diffusion assays, and fluorescence microscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-342
Number of pages8
JournalAccounts of Chemical Research
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 May 1

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Biological membranes
Nanotechnology
Assays
Nanoparticles
Fluorescence microscopy
Cell membranes
Coloring Agents
Gels
Cells
Crystalline materials
Membranes
Scanning
Fluids
Liquids
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Leroueil, Pascale R. ; Hong, Seungpyo ; Mecke, Almut ; Baker, James R. ; Orr, Bradford G. ; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak. / Nanoparticle interaction with biological membranes : Does nanotechnology present a janus face?. In: Accounts of Chemical Research. 2007 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 335-342.
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Nanoparticle interaction with biological membranes : Does nanotechnology present a janus face? / Leroueil, Pascale R.; Hong, Seungpyo; Mecke, Almut; Baker, James R.; Orr, Bradford G.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak.

In: Accounts of Chemical Research, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.05.2007, p. 335-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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