Nanoparticles for multimodal in vivo imaging in nanomedicine

Jaehong Key, James F. Leary

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While nanoparticles are usually designed for targeted drug delivery, they can also simultaneously provide diagnostic information by a variety of in vivo imaging methods. These diagnostic capabilities make use of specific properties of nanoparticle core materials. Near-infrared fluorescent probes provide optical detection of cells targeted by real-time nanoparticle-distribution studies within the organ compartments of live, anesthetized animals. By combining different imaging modalities, we can start with deep-body imaging by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography, and by using optical imaging, get down to the resolution required for real-time fluorescence-guided surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)711-726
Number of pages16
JournalInternational journal of nanomedicine
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 29

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Nanomedicine
Medical nanotechnology
Nanoparticles
Imaging techniques
Optical Imaging
Fluorescent Dyes
Fluorescence
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic resonance
Surgery
Animals
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Infrared radiation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Drug Discovery
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

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Nanoparticles for multimodal in vivo imaging in nanomedicine. / Key, Jaehong; Leary, James F.

In: International journal of nanomedicine, Vol. 9, No. 1, 29.01.2014, p. 711-726.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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