Natural and Synthetic Coral Biomineralization for Human Bone Revitalization

David W. Green, Besim Ben-Nissan, Kyung Sik Yoon, Bruce Milthorpe, Hansung Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coral skeletons can regenerate replacement human bone in nonload-bearing excavated skeletal locations. A combination of multiscale, interconnected pores and channels and highly bioactive surface chemistry has established corals as an important alternative to using healthy host bone replacements. Here, we highlight how coral skeletal systems are being remolded into new calcified structures or synthetic corals by biomimetic processes, as places for the organized permeation of bone tissue cells and blood vessels. Progressive technologies in coral aquaculture and self-organization inorganic chemistry are helping to modify natural corals and create synthetic coral architectures able to accelerate bone regeneration with proper host integration at more skeletal locations, adapted to recent surgical techniques and used to treat intrinsic skeletal deformities and metabolic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-54
Number of pages12
JournalTrends in Biotechnology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

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Biomineralization
Anthozoa
Bone
Bone and Bones
Biomimetic processes
Bearings (structural)
Aquaculture
Blood vessels
Surface chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Permeation
Biomimetics
Tissue
Bone Regeneration
Skeleton
Blood Vessels
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Green, David W. ; Ben-Nissan, Besim ; Yoon, Kyung Sik ; Milthorpe, Bruce ; Jung, Hansung. / Natural and Synthetic Coral Biomineralization for Human Bone Revitalization. In: Trends in Biotechnology. 2017 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 43-54.
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Natural and Synthetic Coral Biomineralization for Human Bone Revitalization. / Green, David W.; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Yoon, Kyung Sik; Milthorpe, Bruce; Jung, Hansung.

In: Trends in Biotechnology, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 43-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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