Network Environments and Well-Being: An Examination of Personal Network Structure, Social Capital, and Perceived Social Support

Seungyoon Lee, Jae Eun Chung, Namkee Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated the role of social networks, social capital, and social support in individuals’ well-being. However, the ways in which these related constructs simultaneously influence one’s well-being outcomes and relate to one another have not been closely examined. This study pays particular attention to the structural characteristics of personal networks, distinction between offline and online social capital, and different indicators of well-being outcomes. Based on survey data collected from 574 college students, the study found that two dimensions of personal networks—density and gender homophily—and social capital in the form of offline bonding capital explained perceived social support. Further, perceived social support consistently predicted well-being outcomes and played a mediating role between personal network density and well-being, as well as between offline bonding capital and well-being. The results offer implications for a more nuanced understanding of the role of individuals’ interpersonal and social environments in well-being outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-31
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Communication
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 2

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Social Support
social capital
social support
well-being
examination
Economics
Students
Social Environment
Social Capital
social network
gender
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

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Network Environments and Well-Being : An Examination of Personal Network Structure, Social Capital, and Perceived Social Support. / Lee, Seungyoon; Chung, Jae Eun; Park, Namkee.

In: Health Communication, Vol. 33, No. 1, 02.01.2018, p. 22-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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