Neural correlates of social perception on response bias

Yeon Soon Shin, Hye young Kim, Sanghoon Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Accurate person perception is crucial in social decision-making. One of the central elements in successful social perception is the ability to understand another's response bias; this is because the same behavior can represent different inner states depending on whether other people are yea-sayers or naysayers. In the present study, we have tried to investigate how the internal biases of others are perceived. Using a multi-trial learning paradigm, perceivers made predictions about a target's responses to various suggested activities and then received feedback for each prediction trial-by-trial. Our hypotheses were that (1) the internal decision criterion of the targets would be realized through repeated experiences, and (2) due to positive-negative asymmetry, yea-sayers would be recognized more gradually than naysayers through the probabilistic integration of repeated experiences. To find neural evidence that tracks probabilistic integration when forming person knowledge on response biases, we employed a model-based fMRI with a State-Space Model. We discovered that person knowledge about yea-sayers modulated several brain regions, including caudate nucleus, DLPFC, hippocampus, etc. Moreover, when person knowledge was updated with incorrect performance feedback, brain regions including the caudate nucleus, DLPFC, dmPFC, and TPJ were also involved. There were overlapping regions for both processes, caudate nucleus and DLPFC, suggesting that these regions take crucial roles in forming person knowledge with repeated feedback, while reflecting acquired information up to the current prediction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-64
Number of pages10
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Social Perception
Caudate Nucleus
Space Simulation
Aptitude
Brain
Hippocampus
Decision Making
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Response Bias
Neural Correlates
Person
Learning
Prediction
Nucleus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Shin, Yeon Soon ; Kim, Hye young ; Han, Sanghoon. / Neural correlates of social perception on response bias. In: Brain and Cognition. 2014 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 55-64.
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Neural correlates of social perception on response bias. / Shin, Yeon Soon; Kim, Hye young; Han, Sanghoon.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 88, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 55-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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