News portrayal of cancer

Content analysis of threat and efficacy by cancer type and comparison with incidence and mortality in Korea

Minsun Shim, Yong-Chan Kim, Su Yeon Kye, Keeho Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How the news media cover cancer may have profound significance for cancer preventionand control; however, little is known about the actual content of cancer news coverage inKorea. This research thus aimed to examine news portrayal of specific cancer types withrespect to threat and efficacy, and to investigate whether news portrayal corresponds toactual cancer statistics. A content analysis of 1,138 cancer news stories was conducted,using a representative sample from 23 news outlets (television, newspapers, and othernews media) in Korea over a 5-year period from 2008 to 2012. Cancer incidence andmortality rates were obtained from the Korean Statistical Information Service. Resultssuggest that threat was most prominent in news stories on pancreatic cancer (with 87% ofthe articles containing threat information with specific details), followed by liver (80%)and lung cancers (70%), and least in stomach cancer (41%). Efficacy information withdetails was conveyed most often in articles on colorectal (54%), skin (54%), and liver (50%)cancers, and least in thyroid cancer (17%). In terms of discrepancies between newsportrayal and actual statistics, the threat of pancreatic and liver cancers was overreported,whereas the threat of stomach and prostate cancers was underreported. Efficacyinformation regarding cervical and colorectal cancers was overrepresented in the newsrelative to cancer statistics; efficacy of lung and thyroid cancers was underreported.Findings provide important implications for medical professionals to understand newsinformation about particular cancers as a basis for public (mis)perception, and tocommunicate effectively about cancer risk with the public and patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1231-1238
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Korean Medical Science
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1

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Korea
Mortality
Incidence
Neoplasms
Liver Neoplasms
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Thyroid Neoplasms
Stomach Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Newspapers
Information Services
Television
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "How the news media cover cancer may have profound significance for cancer preventionand control; however, little is known about the actual content of cancer news coverage inKorea. This research thus aimed to examine news portrayal of specific cancer types withrespect to threat and efficacy, and to investigate whether news portrayal corresponds toactual cancer statistics. A content analysis of 1,138 cancer news stories was conducted,using a representative sample from 23 news outlets (television, newspapers, and othernews media) in Korea over a 5-year period from 2008 to 2012. Cancer incidence andmortality rates were obtained from the Korean Statistical Information Service. Resultssuggest that threat was most prominent in news stories on pancreatic cancer (with 87{\%} ofthe articles containing threat information with specific details), followed by liver (80{\%})and lung cancers (70{\%}), and least in stomach cancer (41{\%}). Efficacy information withdetails was conveyed most often in articles on colorectal (54{\%}), skin (54{\%}), and liver (50{\%})cancers, and least in thyroid cancer (17{\%}). In terms of discrepancies between newsportrayal and actual statistics, the threat of pancreatic and liver cancers was overreported,whereas the threat of stomach and prostate cancers was underreported. Efficacyinformation regarding cervical and colorectal cancers was overrepresented in the newsrelative to cancer statistics; efficacy of lung and thyroid cancers was underreported.Findings provide important implications for medical professionals to understand newsinformation about particular cancers as a basis for public (mis)perception, and tocommunicate effectively about cancer risk with the public and patients.",
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News portrayal of cancer : Content analysis of threat and efficacy by cancer type and comparison with incidence and mortality in Korea. / Shim, Minsun; Kim, Yong-Chan; Kye, Su Yeon; Park, Keeho.

In: Journal of Korean Medical Science, Vol. 31, No. 8, 01.01.2016, p. 1231-1238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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