Non-framework cation migration and irreversible pressure-induced hydration in a zeolite

Yongjae Lee, Thomas Vogt, Joseph A. Hriljac, John B. Parise, Jonathan C. Hanson, Sun Jin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Zeolites crystallize in a variety of three-dimensional structures in which oxygen atoms are shared between tetrahedra containing silicon and/or aluminium, thus yielding negatively charged tetrahedral frameworks that enclose cavities and pores of molecular dimensions occupied by charge-balancing metal cations and water molecules. Cation migration in the pores and changes, in water content associated with concomitant relaxation of the framework have been observed in numerous variable-temperature studies, whereas the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the structure and properties of zeolites are less well explored. The zeolite sodium aluminosilicate natrolite was recently shown to undergo a volume expansion at pressures above 1.2 GPa as a result of reversible pressure-induced hydration; in contrast, a synthetic analogue, potassium gallosilicate natrolite, exhibited irreversible pressure-induced hydration with retention of the high-pressure phase at ambient conditions. Here we report the structure of the high-pressure recovered phase and contrast it with the high-pressure phase of the sodium aluminosilicate natrolite. Our findings show that the irreversible hydration behaviour is associated with a pronounced rearrangement of the non-frame-work metal ions, thus emphasizing that they can clearly have an important role in mediating the overall properties of zeolites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-489
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume420
Issue number6915
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Dec 5

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Zeolites
Cations
Pressure
Metals
Sodium
Hydrostatic Pressure
Water
Silicon
Aluminum
Potassium
Ions
Oxygen
Temperature
natrolite

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Lee, Y., Vogt, T., Hriljac, J. A., Parise, J. B., Hanson, J. C., & Kim, S. J. (2002). Non-framework cation migration and irreversible pressure-induced hydration in a zeolite. Nature, 420(6915), 485-489. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01265
Lee, Yongjae ; Vogt, Thomas ; Hriljac, Joseph A. ; Parise, John B. ; Hanson, Jonathan C. ; Kim, Sun Jin. / Non-framework cation migration and irreversible pressure-induced hydration in a zeolite. In: Nature. 2002 ; Vol. 420, No. 6915. pp. 485-489.
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Lee, Y, Vogt, T, Hriljac, JA, Parise, JB, Hanson, JC & Kim, SJ 2002, 'Non-framework cation migration and irreversible pressure-induced hydration in a zeolite', Nature, vol. 420, no. 6915, pp. 485-489. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature01265

Non-framework cation migration and irreversible pressure-induced hydration in a zeolite. / Lee, Yongjae; Vogt, Thomas; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Parise, John B.; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Kim, Sun Jin.

In: Nature, Vol. 420, No. 6915, 05.12.2002, p. 485-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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