Novel antiviral drug discovery strategies to tackle drug-resistant mutants of influenza virus strains

Woo Jin Shin, Baik Lin Seong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The emergence of drug-resistant influenza virus strains highlights the need for new antiviral therapeutics to combat future pandemic outbreaks as well as continuing seasonal cycles of influenza. Areas covered: This review summarizes the mechanisms of current FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs and patterns of resistance to those drugs. It also discusses potential novel targets for broad-spectrum antiviral drugs and recent progress in novel drug design to overcome drug resistance in influenza. Expert opinion: Using the available structural information about drug-binding pockets, research is currently underway to identify molecular interactions that can be exploited to generate new antiviral drugs. Despite continued efforts, antivirals targeting viral surface proteins like HA, NA, and M2, are all susceptible to developing resistance. Structural information on the internal viral polymerase complex (PB1, PB2, and PA) provides a new avenue for influenza drug discovery. Host factors, either at the initial step of viral infection or at the later step of nuclear trafficking of viral RNP complex, are being actively pursued to generate novel drugs with new modes of action, without resulting in drug resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-168
Number of pages16
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb 1

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Drug Discovery
Orthomyxoviridae
Human Influenza
Antiviral Agents
Drug Resistance
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug Design
Expert Testimony
Viral Proteins
Pandemics
Virus Diseases
Disease Outbreaks
Membrane Proteins
Research
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

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Novel antiviral drug discovery strategies to tackle drug-resistant mutants of influenza virus strains. / Shin, Woo Jin; Seong, Baik Lin.

In: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 153-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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