Obesity and labor market outcomes among legal immigrants to the United States from developing countries

John Cawley, Euna Han, Edward C. Norton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper studies the association between weight and labor market outcomes among legal immigrants to the United States from developing countries using the first nationally representative survey of such individuals. We find that being overweight or obese is associated with a lower probability of employment among women who have been in the U.S. less than five years, but we find no such correlation among men who have been in the U.S. less than five years, or among women or men who have been in the U.S. longer than five years. We generally find no significant association between weight and either wages, sector of employment, or work limitations for either women or men. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-164
Number of pages12
JournalEconomics and Human Biology
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jul 1

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Developing Countries
labor market
Obesity
immigrant
developing country
Weights and Measures
women's employment
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
wage
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Obesity and labor market outcomes among legal immigrants to the United States from developing countries. / Cawley, John; Han, Euna; Norton, Edward C.

In: Economics and Human Biology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.07.2009, p. 153-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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