Occupational noise annoyance linked to depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation: A result from nationwide survey of Korea

JinHa Yoon, Jong Uk Won, Wanhyung Lee, Pil Kyun Jung, Jaehoon Roh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Noise, or undesirable sound, is one of the most common environmental stressors, and it can cause various health effects. Beyond the auditory consequences of occupational noise exposure, extra-auditory effects such as psychological problems have also been found. The aim of the current study is to elucidate the association between occupational noise annoyance and psychological symptoms, including symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation. Methods: A total of 10,020 participants (5,410 men and 4,610 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess noise annoyance levels, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for psychosocial symptoms were calculated using multiple logistic regression models. Results: Compared to the no noise annoyance group, ORs (95% CI) of the severe annoyance groups were 1.58 (1.12-2.23) and 1.76 (1.29-2.40) in men and 1.49 (1.05-2.11) and 1.41 (1.01-1.97) in women for depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, respectively. The ORs (95% CI) for severe noise annoyance in those with less than five hours of sleep were 2.95 (1.46-5.96) and 2.05 (1.01-4.16) in men and women, respectively, compared with those with no noise annoyance and a sleep time of more than five hours. Conclusion: Our study shows that occupational noise annoyance is significantly related to mental health, including depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation after controlling for individual and socio-demographic characteristics even with gender stratification. However, prospective studies with quantified noise exposure assessment were needed to elucidate the causality on the association between noise annoyance and psychological symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere105321
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Aug 21

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Occupational Noise
Suicidal Ideation
national surveys
Korea
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Korean Peninsula
Noise
Health
Depression
Nutrition
Acoustic noise
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Psychology
Logistics
odds ratio
Acoustic waves
Sleep
confidence interval
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Yoon, JinHa ; Won, Jong Uk ; Lee, Wanhyung ; Jung, Pil Kyun ; Roh, Jaehoon. / Occupational noise annoyance linked to depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation : A result from nationwide survey of Korea. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 8.
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title = "Occupational noise annoyance linked to depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation: A result from nationwide survey of Korea",
abstract = "Background: Noise, or undesirable sound, is one of the most common environmental stressors, and it can cause various health effects. Beyond the auditory consequences of occupational noise exposure, extra-auditory effects such as psychological problems have also been found. The aim of the current study is to elucidate the association between occupational noise annoyance and psychological symptoms, including symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation. Methods: A total of 10,020 participants (5,410 men and 4,610 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess noise annoyance levels, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (95{\%} CIs) for psychosocial symptoms were calculated using multiple logistic regression models. Results: Compared to the no noise annoyance group, ORs (95{\%} CI) of the severe annoyance groups were 1.58 (1.12-2.23) and 1.76 (1.29-2.40) in men and 1.49 (1.05-2.11) and 1.41 (1.01-1.97) in women for depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, respectively. The ORs (95{\%} CI) for severe noise annoyance in those with less than five hours of sleep were 2.95 (1.46-5.96) and 2.05 (1.01-4.16) in men and women, respectively, compared with those with no noise annoyance and a sleep time of more than five hours. Conclusion: Our study shows that occupational noise annoyance is significantly related to mental health, including depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation after controlling for individual and socio-demographic characteristics even with gender stratification. However, prospective studies with quantified noise exposure assessment were needed to elucidate the causality on the association between noise annoyance and psychological symptoms.",
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Occupational noise annoyance linked to depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation : A result from nationwide survey of Korea. / Yoon, JinHa; Won, Jong Uk; Lee, Wanhyung; Jung, Pil Kyun; Roh, Jaehoon.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 8, e105321, 21.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Occupational noise annoyance linked to depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation

T2 - A result from nationwide survey of Korea

AU - Yoon, JinHa

AU - Won, Jong Uk

AU - Lee, Wanhyung

AU - Jung, Pil Kyun

AU - Roh, Jaehoon

PY - 2014/8/21

Y1 - 2014/8/21

N2 - Background: Noise, or undesirable sound, is one of the most common environmental stressors, and it can cause various health effects. Beyond the auditory consequences of occupational noise exposure, extra-auditory effects such as psychological problems have also been found. The aim of the current study is to elucidate the association between occupational noise annoyance and psychological symptoms, including symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation. Methods: A total of 10,020 participants (5,410 men and 4,610 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess noise annoyance levels, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for psychosocial symptoms were calculated using multiple logistic regression models. Results: Compared to the no noise annoyance group, ORs (95% CI) of the severe annoyance groups were 1.58 (1.12-2.23) and 1.76 (1.29-2.40) in men and 1.49 (1.05-2.11) and 1.41 (1.01-1.97) in women for depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, respectively. The ORs (95% CI) for severe noise annoyance in those with less than five hours of sleep were 2.95 (1.46-5.96) and 2.05 (1.01-4.16) in men and women, respectively, compared with those with no noise annoyance and a sleep time of more than five hours. Conclusion: Our study shows that occupational noise annoyance is significantly related to mental health, including depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation after controlling for individual and socio-demographic characteristics even with gender stratification. However, prospective studies with quantified noise exposure assessment were needed to elucidate the causality on the association between noise annoyance and psychological symptoms.

AB - Background: Noise, or undesirable sound, is one of the most common environmental stressors, and it can cause various health effects. Beyond the auditory consequences of occupational noise exposure, extra-auditory effects such as psychological problems have also been found. The aim of the current study is to elucidate the association between occupational noise annoyance and psychological symptoms, including symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation. Methods: A total of 10,020 participants (5,410 men and 4,610 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess noise annoyance levels, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for psychosocial symptoms were calculated using multiple logistic regression models. Results: Compared to the no noise annoyance group, ORs (95% CI) of the severe annoyance groups were 1.58 (1.12-2.23) and 1.76 (1.29-2.40) in men and 1.49 (1.05-2.11) and 1.41 (1.01-1.97) in women for depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation, respectively. The ORs (95% CI) for severe noise annoyance in those with less than five hours of sleep were 2.95 (1.46-5.96) and 2.05 (1.01-4.16) in men and women, respectively, compared with those with no noise annoyance and a sleep time of more than five hours. Conclusion: Our study shows that occupational noise annoyance is significantly related to mental health, including depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation after controlling for individual and socio-demographic characteristics even with gender stratification. However, prospective studies with quantified noise exposure assessment were needed to elucidate the causality on the association between noise annoyance and psychological symptoms.

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