Older donor allografts are associated with poor patient survival after living donor liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver diseases

Do Young Kim, Moon Seok Choi, Joon Hyoek Lee, Kwang Cheol Koh, Seung Woon Paik, Byung Chul Yoo, Jae Won Joh, Suk Koo Lee, Jong Chul Rhee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: The significance of donor age in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has not been fully evaluated. Methods: We analyzed the data of 136 patients who underwent LDLT for HBV-related liver diseases from January 1999 to April 2004. The recipients were divided into an older donor group (donor age ≥40) and a younger donor group (donor age <40). Posttransplant clinical outcomes and survival were compared between two groups, and predictors of survival after LDLT were evaluated. Results: Baseline characteristics were not different between the two groups, except for more number of female donors and higher positive donor anti-HBc rate in the older group. The frequencies of acute rejection and early mortality after transplantation were similar in the two groups. The long-term survival rates for the older donor group were significantly lower than those of the younger donor group (1-, 3-, 5-year survival rate = 84%, 75%, 46% vs. 92%, 86%, and 83%, P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that older donor age was the only independent risk factor associated with survival after LDLT (HR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.1-5.6, P = 0.04). Conclusions: Our study suggests that older donor allografts would be associated with poor patient survival after LDLT for HBV-related liver diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-267
Number of pages8
JournalLiver International
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Mar 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology

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