Omeprazole may be superior to famotidine in the management of iatrogenic ulcer after endoscopic mucosal resection: A prospective randomized controlled trial

B. D. Ye, J. H. Cheon, K. D. Choi, S. G. Kim, J. S. Kim, H. C. Jung, I. S. Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acid suppressing agents are widely used to treat the iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection for gastric neoplasms. However, the relative merits of proton pump inhibitor or histamine2-receptor antagonist for endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers are not known. Aim: To prospectively compare omeprazole and famotidine for the healing of endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers and for bleeding control. Methods: After endoscopic mucosal resection, patients were randomly assigned to omeprazole (20 mg/day) or to famotidine (40 mg/day) group for a 28-day treatment period. The ulcer sizes and stages, bleeding rates and ulcer-related symptoms were compared. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized equally to each group. Forty-one patients in each group were finally compared. The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Twenty-eight days after treatment, the two groups were not different with respect to ulcer stage (P = 0.137) or ulcer reduction ratio (P = 0.380). No difference was observed with respect to ulcer-related symptoms (P = 0.437) and no bleeding episode occurred in any of the 82 patients. In subgroup that underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection, fewer patients in the omeprazole group showed active ulcers than those in the famotidine group (P = 0.035). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that omeprazole may be superior to famotidine for iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection, especially for large ulcers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-843
Number of pages7
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Sep 1

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Famotidine
Omeprazole
Ulcer
Randomized Controlled Trials
Hemorrhage
Endoscopic Mucosal Resection
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Stomach Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Omeprazole may be superior to famotidine in the management of iatrogenic ulcer after endoscopic mucosal resection: A prospective randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: Acid suppressing agents are widely used to treat the iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection for gastric neoplasms. However, the relative merits of proton pump inhibitor or histamine2-receptor antagonist for endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers are not known. Aim: To prospectively compare omeprazole and famotidine for the healing of endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers and for bleeding control. Methods: After endoscopic mucosal resection, patients were randomly assigned to omeprazole (20 mg/day) or to famotidine (40 mg/day) group for a 28-day treatment period. The ulcer sizes and stages, bleeding rates and ulcer-related symptoms were compared. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized equally to each group. Forty-one patients in each group were finally compared. The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Twenty-eight days after treatment, the two groups were not different with respect to ulcer stage (P = 0.137) or ulcer reduction ratio (P = 0.380). No difference was observed with respect to ulcer-related symptoms (P = 0.437) and no bleeding episode occurred in any of the 82 patients. In subgroup that underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection, fewer patients in the omeprazole group showed active ulcers than those in the famotidine group (P = 0.035). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that omeprazole may be superior to famotidine for iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection, especially for large ulcers.",
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Omeprazole may be superior to famotidine in the management of iatrogenic ulcer after endoscopic mucosal resection : A prospective randomized controlled trial. / Ye, B. D.; Cheon, J. H.; Choi, K. D.; Kim, S. G.; Kim, J. S.; Jung, H. C.; Song, I. S.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.09.2006, p. 837-843.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Omeprazole may be superior to famotidine in the management of iatrogenic ulcer after endoscopic mucosal resection

T2 - A prospective randomized controlled trial

AU - Ye, B. D.

AU - Cheon, J. H.

AU - Choi, K. D.

AU - Kim, S. G.

AU - Kim, J. S.

AU - Jung, H. C.

AU - Song, I. S.

PY - 2006/9/1

Y1 - 2006/9/1

N2 - Background: Acid suppressing agents are widely used to treat the iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection for gastric neoplasms. However, the relative merits of proton pump inhibitor or histamine2-receptor antagonist for endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers are not known. Aim: To prospectively compare omeprazole and famotidine for the healing of endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers and for bleeding control. Methods: After endoscopic mucosal resection, patients were randomly assigned to omeprazole (20 mg/day) or to famotidine (40 mg/day) group for a 28-day treatment period. The ulcer sizes and stages, bleeding rates and ulcer-related symptoms were compared. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized equally to each group. Forty-one patients in each group were finally compared. The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Twenty-eight days after treatment, the two groups were not different with respect to ulcer stage (P = 0.137) or ulcer reduction ratio (P = 0.380). No difference was observed with respect to ulcer-related symptoms (P = 0.437) and no bleeding episode occurred in any of the 82 patients. In subgroup that underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection, fewer patients in the omeprazole group showed active ulcers than those in the famotidine group (P = 0.035). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that omeprazole may be superior to famotidine for iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection, especially for large ulcers.

AB - Background: Acid suppressing agents are widely used to treat the iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection for gastric neoplasms. However, the relative merits of proton pump inhibitor or histamine2-receptor antagonist for endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers are not known. Aim: To prospectively compare omeprazole and famotidine for the healing of endoscopic mucosal resection-induced ulcers and for bleeding control. Methods: After endoscopic mucosal resection, patients were randomly assigned to omeprazole (20 mg/day) or to famotidine (40 mg/day) group for a 28-day treatment period. The ulcer sizes and stages, bleeding rates and ulcer-related symptoms were compared. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized equally to each group. Forty-one patients in each group were finally compared. The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Twenty-eight days after treatment, the two groups were not different with respect to ulcer stage (P = 0.137) or ulcer reduction ratio (P = 0.380). No difference was observed with respect to ulcer-related symptoms (P = 0.437) and no bleeding episode occurred in any of the 82 patients. In subgroup that underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection, fewer patients in the omeprazole group showed active ulcers than those in the famotidine group (P = 0.035). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that omeprazole may be superior to famotidine for iatrogenic ulcers following endoscopic mucosal resection, especially for large ulcers.

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