Opening the black box: Why and when workplace exclusion affects social reconnection behaviour, health, and attitudes

Kristin L. Scott, Stefan Tams, Michaéla C. Schippers, Ki Young Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By integrating belongingness theory and the sensitivity about being the target of a threatening upward comparison (STTUC) theory, we explicate a process through which co-worker exclusion is positively related to social reconnection behaviour in the workplace. Specifically, we argued and found that exclusion prompts ingratiatory and citizenship behaviours via the perception of being envied by colleagues. Despite these positive outcomes, we also found the mediated relationship of exclusion and perceptions of being envied to be damaging to workers’ psychological health and work-related attitudes, and that these relationships were the strongest among employees with high positive affect (PA). We tested our model across two distinct samples that included full-time Dutch (Study 1) and American (Study 2) employees. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-255
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 4

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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