Optical manipulation of microscopic particles using Bessel beams

J. Arlt, R. C. Kuhn, K. Dholakia

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper reports the use of free space zeroth-order Bessel beams for the optical manipulation of trapped microscopic particles. A conically shaped optical element was used, with an internal angle of one degree to generate Bessel beam. A simple telescope was used to reduce the size of the central maximum of the Bessel beam to about 8 microns in diameter. The Bessel beam had an overall propagation distance of about 5 mm in this instance. This beam was used to trap and manipulate silica spheres.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Dec 1
EventConference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO 2000) - San Francisco, CA, USA
Duration: 2000 May 72000 May 12

Other

OtherConference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO 2000)
CitySan Francisco, CA, USA
Period00/5/700/5/12

Fingerprint

Optical devices
Telescopes
Silicon Dioxide
manipulators
Silica
trapped particles
traps
telescopes
silicon dioxide
propagation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Arlt, J., Kuhn, R. C., & Dholakia, K. (2000). Optical manipulation of microscopic particles using Bessel beams. Paper presented at Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO 2000), San Francisco, CA, USA, .
Arlt, J. ; Kuhn, R. C. ; Dholakia, K. / Optical manipulation of microscopic particles using Bessel beams. Paper presented at Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO 2000), San Francisco, CA, USA, .1 p.
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Arlt, J, Kuhn, RC & Dholakia, K 2000, 'Optical manipulation of microscopic particles using Bessel beams', Paper presented at Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO 2000), San Francisco, CA, USA, 00/5/7 - 00/5/12.

Optical manipulation of microscopic particles using Bessel beams. / Arlt, J.; Kuhn, R. C.; Dholakia, K.

2000. Paper presented at Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO 2000), San Francisco, CA, USA, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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AU - Kuhn, R. C.

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Arlt J, Kuhn RC, Dholakia K. Optical manipulation of microscopic particles using Bessel beams. 2000. Paper presented at Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO 2000), San Francisco, CA, USA, .