Optimal interdiction of a ground convoy

Dong Hwan Oh, R. Kevin Wood, Young Hoon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper explores the convoy quickest-path interdiction problem (CQPI). In this problem, an interdictor or attacker uses limited offensive resources to attack components of a road network (i.e., road segments or intersections) to maximally delay a ground convoy transiting between specified origin and destination nodes in the network. The convoy’s commander, or defender, routes the convoy on a quickest path, which determines a convoy’s instantaneous speed by the convoy’s length, network characteristics (e.g., topology, speed limits), and by doctrine. After defining this new convoy quickest-path (CQP) problem, we develop an A* search algorithm for its solution. Finally, assuming a binary interdiction model in which an interdicted network component becomes impassable, we note the CQPI is NP-hard and show how to solve instances using a decomposition algorithm that solves CQP subproblems to evaluate tentative interdiction plans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-17
Number of pages13
JournalMilitary Operations Research
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

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Network components
Computational complexity
Topology
Decomposition
Road network
Resources
Roads
Node
Attack
NP-hard
Destination

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

Oh, Dong Hwan ; Kevin Wood, R. ; Lee, Young Hoon. / Optimal interdiction of a ground convoy. In: Military Operations Research. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 5-17.
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Optimal interdiction of a ground convoy. / Oh, Dong Hwan; Kevin Wood, R.; Lee, Young Hoon.

In: Military Operations Research, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 5-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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