Particle Size Distribution by Sedimentation/Steric Field-Flow Fractionation: Development of a Calibration Procedure Based on Density Compensation

J. Calvin Giddings, Myeong Hee Moon, P. Stephen Williams, Marcus N. Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because of the Important but mathematically complex role played by hydrodynamic lift forces In sedlmentatlon/steric FFF, applied generally to particles 1 µm In diameter, retention cannot readily be related to particle diameter on the basis of simple theory. Consequently, empirical calibration Is needed. Unfortunately, retention is based on particle density as well as size so that a purely size-based calibration (e.g., with polystyrene latex standards) is not generally valid. By examining the balance between driving and lift forces, it Is concluded that equal retention will be observed for equal size particles subject to equal driving forces Irrespective of particle density. Therefore by adjusting the rotation rate to exactly compensate for density, retention can be brought in line with that of standards, a conclusion verified by microscopy. Linear calibration plots of log (retention time) versus log (diameter) can then be used. This approach Is applied to two glass bead samples (5-30 and 5-50 µm) using both a conventional and a pinched Inlet channel. The resulting size distribution curves are self consistent and in good agreement with results obtained independently.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1366-1372
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume63
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1991 Jul 1

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Fractionation
Sedimentation
Particle size analysis
Flow fields
Calibration
Microscopic examination
Hydrodynamics
Particle size
Glass
Compensation and Redress

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Because of the Important but mathematically complex role played by hydrodynamic lift forces In sedlmentatlon/steric FFF, applied generally to particles 1 µm In diameter, retention cannot readily be related to particle diameter on the basis of simple theory. Consequently, empirical calibration Is needed. Unfortunately, retention is based on particle density as well as size so that a purely size-based calibration (e.g., with polystyrene latex standards) is not generally valid. By examining the balance between driving and lift forces, it Is concluded that equal retention will be observed for equal size particles subject to equal driving forces Irrespective of particle density. Therefore by adjusting the rotation rate to exactly compensate for density, retention can be brought in line with that of standards, a conclusion verified by microscopy. Linear calibration plots of log (retention time) versus log (diameter) can then be used. This approach Is applied to two glass bead samples (5-30 and 5-50 µm) using both a conventional and a pinched Inlet channel. The resulting size distribution curves are self consistent and in good agreement with results obtained independently.",
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Particle Size Distribution by Sedimentation/Steric Field-Flow Fractionation : Development of a Calibration Procedure Based on Density Compensation. / Calvin Giddings, J.; Moon, Myeong Hee; Stephen Williams, P.; Myers, Marcus N.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 63, No. 14, 01.07.1991, p. 1366-1372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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