Patient satisfaction after endoscopic submucosal dissection under propofol-based sedation: a small premedication makes all the difference

Seokyung Shin, Chan Hyuk Park, Hyun Ju Kim, Sang Hun Park, Sang Kil Lee, Young Chul Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ideal sedation for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) aims to satisfy both the endoscopist and patient. However, previous studies show that a satisfactory procedure for the endoscopist does not equal higher patient satisfaction. This study attempted to find a sedation protocol that is able to increase patient satisfaction during propofol-based sedation by adding low-dose midazolam as premedication. Methods: Seventy-two adult patients were randomly allocated to receive either 0.02 mg/kg midazolam (Midazolam Group) or placebo (Control Group) as premedication before ESD. Sedation was done by targeting Modified Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (MOAA/S) scale of 3 or 4 with continuous propofol infusion and bolus doses of fentanyl. Satisfaction scores of the endoscopists and patients, and whether the patient was willing to receive the same sedation method in the future was assessed. Interim analysis was done after enrollment of 50 % of patients. Results: This study was prematurely terminated when interim analysis showed that patients willing to receive the same sedation method in the future were significantly lower in the Control Group compared to the Midazolam Group (P = 0.001). There was no difference in sedation time, procedure and recovery time, drug requirements and adverse events between the two groups. Endoscopist and overall patient satisfaction scores, patient pain scores and degree of recall were also similar between groups. Conclusions: A small dose of midazolam given as premedication before propofol-based sedation is able to reduce patient reluctance to repeat the same procedure in the future, without affecting procedural performance, recovery time or endoscopist satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2636-2644
Number of pages9
JournalSurgical endoscopy
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun 1

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Premedication
Propofol
Patient Satisfaction
Midazolam
Control Groups
Endoscopic Mucosal Resection
Fentanyl
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Placebos
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Shin, Seokyung ; Park, Chan Hyuk ; Kim, Hyun Ju ; Park, Sang Hun ; Lee, Sang Kil ; Yoo, Young Chul. / Patient satisfaction after endoscopic submucosal dissection under propofol-based sedation : a small premedication makes all the difference. In: Surgical endoscopy. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 2636-2644.
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abstract = "Background: Ideal sedation for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) aims to satisfy both the endoscopist and patient. However, previous studies show that a satisfactory procedure for the endoscopist does not equal higher patient satisfaction. This study attempted to find a sedation protocol that is able to increase patient satisfaction during propofol-based sedation by adding low-dose midazolam as premedication. Methods: Seventy-two adult patients were randomly allocated to receive either 0.02 mg/kg midazolam (Midazolam Group) or placebo (Control Group) as premedication before ESD. Sedation was done by targeting Modified Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (MOAA/S) scale of 3 or 4 with continuous propofol infusion and bolus doses of fentanyl. Satisfaction scores of the endoscopists and patients, and whether the patient was willing to receive the same sedation method in the future was assessed. Interim analysis was done after enrollment of 50 {\%} of patients. Results: This study was prematurely terminated when interim analysis showed that patients willing to receive the same sedation method in the future were significantly lower in the Control Group compared to the Midazolam Group (P = 0.001). There was no difference in sedation time, procedure and recovery time, drug requirements and adverse events between the two groups. Endoscopist and overall patient satisfaction scores, patient pain scores and degree of recall were also similar between groups. Conclusions: A small dose of midazolam given as premedication before propofol-based sedation is able to reduce patient reluctance to repeat the same procedure in the future, without affecting procedural performance, recovery time or endoscopist satisfaction.",
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Patient satisfaction after endoscopic submucosal dissection under propofol-based sedation : a small premedication makes all the difference. / Shin, Seokyung; Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Hyun Ju; Park, Sang Hun; Lee, Sang Kil; Yoo, Young Chul.

In: Surgical endoscopy, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 2636-2644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Yoo, Young Chul

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