Periodic endoscopies might not increase the detection of early gastric cancer in a young population

Chan Hyuk Park, Eun Hye Kim, Hyunsoo Chung, Jun Chul Park, Sung Kwan Shin, Yong Chan Lee, Ji Yeong An, Hyoung Il Kim, Jae Ho Cheong, Woo Jin Hyung, Sung Hoon Noh, Choong Bae Kim, Sang Kil Lee

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Abstract

Background Screening endoscopies in individuals 40 years or older in regions where gastric cancer is prevalent increase the diagnosis of gastric cancer at an early stage. However, the benefits of screening endoscopies in a young population (<40 years) have not been evaluated. Methods We reviewed data from patients less than 40 years old who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection or surgery for initial-onset gastric cancer. We also administered a questionnaire to gather information concerning periodic endoscopic inspections and the period from the penultimate endoscopy to diagnosis. Results Of the 564 patients in this study, 101 (17.9%) patients underwent screening endoscopy within 24 months of their gastric cancer diagnosis. Lesion size was significantly smaller in the ≤24 months group than in the >24 month group (23.8 mm [standard deviation, 22.2 mm] vs. 30.5 mm [standard deviation, 23.1 mm], P = 0.008). However, the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer did not differ between the two groups (≤24 months vs. >24 months group; 67.6% vs. 65.7%, P = 0.712). On multivariable analysis, periodic endoscopies did not influence the early diagnosis of gastric cancer (with >24 months as the reference group: ≤24 months, odds ratio = 0.939, 95% confidence interval = 0.583-1.513). Conclusion Although periodic endoscopies aided in the detection of gastric cancer when lesions were smaller in size, they seemed not to increase the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer in young patients diagnosed with resectable gastric cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0159759
JournalPloS one
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jul

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Endoscopy
stomach neoplasms
endoscopy
Stomach Neoplasms
Population
Screening
screening
early diagnosis
Early Detection of Cancer
odds ratio
confidence interval
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Park, Chan Hyuk ; Kim, Eun Hye ; Chung, Hyunsoo ; Park, Jun Chul ; Shin, Sung Kwan ; Lee, Yong Chan ; An, Ji Yeong ; Kim, Hyoung Il ; Cheong, Jae Ho ; Hyung, Woo Jin ; Noh, Sung Hoon ; Kim, Choong Bae ; Lee, Sang Kil. / Periodic endoscopies might not increase the detection of early gastric cancer in a young population. In: PloS one. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 7.
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title = "Periodic endoscopies might not increase the detection of early gastric cancer in a young population",
abstract = "Background Screening endoscopies in individuals 40 years or older in regions where gastric cancer is prevalent increase the diagnosis of gastric cancer at an early stage. However, the benefits of screening endoscopies in a young population (<40 years) have not been evaluated. Methods We reviewed data from patients less than 40 years old who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection or surgery for initial-onset gastric cancer. We also administered a questionnaire to gather information concerning periodic endoscopic inspections and the period from the penultimate endoscopy to diagnosis. Results Of the 564 patients in this study, 101 (17.9{\%}) patients underwent screening endoscopy within 24 months of their gastric cancer diagnosis. Lesion size was significantly smaller in the ≤24 months group than in the >24 month group (23.8 mm [standard deviation, 22.2 mm] vs. 30.5 mm [standard deviation, 23.1 mm], P = 0.008). However, the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer did not differ between the two groups (≤24 months vs. >24 months group; 67.6{\%} vs. 65.7{\%}, P = 0.712). On multivariable analysis, periodic endoscopies did not influence the early diagnosis of gastric cancer (with >24 months as the reference group: ≤24 months, odds ratio = 0.939, 95{\%} confidence interval = 0.583-1.513). Conclusion Although periodic endoscopies aided in the detection of gastric cancer when lesions were smaller in size, they seemed not to increase the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer in young patients diagnosed with resectable gastric cancer.",
author = "Park, {Chan Hyuk} and Kim, {Eun Hye} and Hyunsoo Chung and Park, {Jun Chul} and Shin, {Sung Kwan} and Lee, {Yong Chan} and An, {Ji Yeong} and Kim, {Hyoung Il} and Cheong, {Jae Ho} and Hyung, {Woo Jin} and Noh, {Sung Hoon} and Kim, {Choong Bae} and Lee, {Sang Kil}",
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Park, CH, Kim, EH, Chung, H, Park, JC, Shin, SK, Lee, YC, An, JY, Kim, HI, Cheong, JH, Hyung, WJ, Noh, SH, Kim, CB & Lee, SK 2016, 'Periodic endoscopies might not increase the detection of early gastric cancer in a young population', PloS one, vol. 11, no. 7, e0159759. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159759

Periodic endoscopies might not increase the detection of early gastric cancer in a young population. / Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Eun Hye; Chung, Hyunsoo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Yong Chan; An, Ji Yeong; Kim, Hyoung Il; Cheong, Jae Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong Bae; Lee, Sang Kil.

In: PloS one, Vol. 11, No. 7, e0159759, 07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Periodic endoscopies might not increase the detection of early gastric cancer in a young population

AU - Park, Chan Hyuk

AU - Kim, Eun Hye

AU - Chung, Hyunsoo

AU - Park, Jun Chul

AU - Shin, Sung Kwan

AU - Lee, Yong Chan

AU - An, Ji Yeong

AU - Kim, Hyoung Il

AU - Cheong, Jae Ho

AU - Hyung, Woo Jin

AU - Noh, Sung Hoon

AU - Kim, Choong Bae

AU - Lee, Sang Kil

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - Background Screening endoscopies in individuals 40 years or older in regions where gastric cancer is prevalent increase the diagnosis of gastric cancer at an early stage. However, the benefits of screening endoscopies in a young population (<40 years) have not been evaluated. Methods We reviewed data from patients less than 40 years old who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection or surgery for initial-onset gastric cancer. We also administered a questionnaire to gather information concerning periodic endoscopic inspections and the period from the penultimate endoscopy to diagnosis. Results Of the 564 patients in this study, 101 (17.9%) patients underwent screening endoscopy within 24 months of their gastric cancer diagnosis. Lesion size was significantly smaller in the ≤24 months group than in the >24 month group (23.8 mm [standard deviation, 22.2 mm] vs. 30.5 mm [standard deviation, 23.1 mm], P = 0.008). However, the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer did not differ between the two groups (≤24 months vs. >24 months group; 67.6% vs. 65.7%, P = 0.712). On multivariable analysis, periodic endoscopies did not influence the early diagnosis of gastric cancer (with >24 months as the reference group: ≤24 months, odds ratio = 0.939, 95% confidence interval = 0.583-1.513). Conclusion Although periodic endoscopies aided in the detection of gastric cancer when lesions were smaller in size, they seemed not to increase the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer in young patients diagnosed with resectable gastric cancer.

AB - Background Screening endoscopies in individuals 40 years or older in regions where gastric cancer is prevalent increase the diagnosis of gastric cancer at an early stage. However, the benefits of screening endoscopies in a young population (<40 years) have not been evaluated. Methods We reviewed data from patients less than 40 years old who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection or surgery for initial-onset gastric cancer. We also administered a questionnaire to gather information concerning periodic endoscopic inspections and the period from the penultimate endoscopy to diagnosis. Results Of the 564 patients in this study, 101 (17.9%) patients underwent screening endoscopy within 24 months of their gastric cancer diagnosis. Lesion size was significantly smaller in the ≤24 months group than in the >24 month group (23.8 mm [standard deviation, 22.2 mm] vs. 30.5 mm [standard deviation, 23.1 mm], P = 0.008). However, the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer did not differ between the two groups (≤24 months vs. >24 months group; 67.6% vs. 65.7%, P = 0.712). On multivariable analysis, periodic endoscopies did not influence the early diagnosis of gastric cancer (with >24 months as the reference group: ≤24 months, odds ratio = 0.939, 95% confidence interval = 0.583-1.513). Conclusion Although periodic endoscopies aided in the detection of gastric cancer when lesions were smaller in size, they seemed not to increase the proportion of patients with early gastric cancer in young patients diagnosed with resectable gastric cancer.

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