Photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications

A preliminary study with 8-gauge core-biopsied breast specimens

Ga Ram Kim, Jeeun Kang, jinyoung kwak, Jin Ho Chang, Seung Il Kim, Ji Hyun Youk, Hee Jung Moon, minjung Kim, Eunkyung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We presented the photoacoustic imaging (PAI) tool and to evaluate whether microcalcifications in breast tissue can be detected on photoacoustic (PA) images. Methods: We collected 21 cores containing microcalcifications (n = 11, microcalcification group) and none (n = 10, control group) in stereotactic or ultrasound (US) guided 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. Photoacoustic (PA) images were acquired through ex vivo experiments by transmitting laser pulses with two different wavelengths (700 nm and 800 nm). The presence of microcalcifications in PA images were blindly assessed by two radiologists and compared with specimen mammography. A ratio of the signal amplitude occurring at 700 nm to that occurring at 800 nm was calculated for each PA focus and was called the PAI ratio. Results: Based on the change of PA signal amplitude between 700 nm and 800 nm, 10 out of 11 specimens containing microcalcifications and 8 out of 10 specimens without calcifications were correctly identified on blind review; the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive and negative predictive values of our blind review were 90.91%, 80.0%, 85.71%, 83.33% and 88.89%. The PAI ratio in the microcalcification group was significantly higher than that in the control group (the median PAI ratio, 2.46 versus 1.11, respectively, P = .001). On subgroup analysis in the microcalcification group, neither malignant diagnosis nor the number or size of calcification-foci was proven to contribute to PAI ratios. Conclusion: Breast microcalcifications generated distinguishable PA signals unlike breast tissue without calcifications. So, PAI, a non-ionizing and non-invasive hybrid imaging technique, can be an alternative in overcoming the limitations of conventional US imaging.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere105878
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Aug 25

Fingerprint

Calcinosis
Photoacoustic effect
gauges
Gages
breasts
Breast
image analysis
Imaging techniques
calcification
vacuum gauges
Multimodal Imaging
Control Groups
ultrasonography
Mammography
Vacuum
lasers
Ultrasonics
Vacuum gages
wavelengths
biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Kim, Ga Ram ; Kang, Jeeun ; kwak, jinyoung ; Chang, Jin Ho ; Kim, Seung Il ; Youk, Ji Hyun ; Moon, Hee Jung ; Kim, minjung ; Kim, Eunkyung. / Photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications : A preliminary study with 8-gauge core-biopsied breast specimens. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 8.
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title = "Photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications: A preliminary study with 8-gauge core-biopsied breast specimens",
abstract = "Background: We presented the photoacoustic imaging (PAI) tool and to evaluate whether microcalcifications in breast tissue can be detected on photoacoustic (PA) images. Methods: We collected 21 cores containing microcalcifications (n = 11, microcalcification group) and none (n = 10, control group) in stereotactic or ultrasound (US) guided 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. Photoacoustic (PA) images were acquired through ex vivo experiments by transmitting laser pulses with two different wavelengths (700 nm and 800 nm). The presence of microcalcifications in PA images were blindly assessed by two radiologists and compared with specimen mammography. A ratio of the signal amplitude occurring at 700 nm to that occurring at 800 nm was calculated for each PA focus and was called the PAI ratio. Results: Based on the change of PA signal amplitude between 700 nm and 800 nm, 10 out of 11 specimens containing microcalcifications and 8 out of 10 specimens without calcifications were correctly identified on blind review; the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive and negative predictive values of our blind review were 90.91{\%}, 80.0{\%}, 85.71{\%}, 83.33{\%} and 88.89{\%}. The PAI ratio in the microcalcification group was significantly higher than that in the control group (the median PAI ratio, 2.46 versus 1.11, respectively, P = .001). On subgroup analysis in the microcalcification group, neither malignant diagnosis nor the number or size of calcification-foci was proven to contribute to PAI ratios. Conclusion: Breast microcalcifications generated distinguishable PA signals unlike breast tissue without calcifications. So, PAI, a non-ionizing and non-invasive hybrid imaging technique, can be an alternative in overcoming the limitations of conventional US imaging.",
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Photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications : A preliminary study with 8-gauge core-biopsied breast specimens. / Kim, Ga Ram; Kang, Jeeun; kwak, jinyoung; Chang, Jin Ho; Kim, Seung Il; Youk, Ji Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, minjung; Kim, Eunkyung.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 8, e105878, 25.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications

T2 - A preliminary study with 8-gauge core-biopsied breast specimens

AU - Kim, Ga Ram

AU - Kang, Jeeun

AU - kwak, jinyoung

AU - Chang, Jin Ho

AU - Kim, Seung Il

AU - Youk, Ji Hyun

AU - Moon, Hee Jung

AU - Kim, minjung

AU - Kim, Eunkyung

PY - 2014/8/25

Y1 - 2014/8/25

N2 - Background: We presented the photoacoustic imaging (PAI) tool and to evaluate whether microcalcifications in breast tissue can be detected on photoacoustic (PA) images. Methods: We collected 21 cores containing microcalcifications (n = 11, microcalcification group) and none (n = 10, control group) in stereotactic or ultrasound (US) guided 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. Photoacoustic (PA) images were acquired through ex vivo experiments by transmitting laser pulses with two different wavelengths (700 nm and 800 nm). The presence of microcalcifications in PA images were blindly assessed by two radiologists and compared with specimen mammography. A ratio of the signal amplitude occurring at 700 nm to that occurring at 800 nm was calculated for each PA focus and was called the PAI ratio. Results: Based on the change of PA signal amplitude between 700 nm and 800 nm, 10 out of 11 specimens containing microcalcifications and 8 out of 10 specimens without calcifications were correctly identified on blind review; the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive and negative predictive values of our blind review were 90.91%, 80.0%, 85.71%, 83.33% and 88.89%. The PAI ratio in the microcalcification group was significantly higher than that in the control group (the median PAI ratio, 2.46 versus 1.11, respectively, P = .001). On subgroup analysis in the microcalcification group, neither malignant diagnosis nor the number or size of calcification-foci was proven to contribute to PAI ratios. Conclusion: Breast microcalcifications generated distinguishable PA signals unlike breast tissue without calcifications. So, PAI, a non-ionizing and non-invasive hybrid imaging technique, can be an alternative in overcoming the limitations of conventional US imaging.

AB - Background: We presented the photoacoustic imaging (PAI) tool and to evaluate whether microcalcifications in breast tissue can be detected on photoacoustic (PA) images. Methods: We collected 21 cores containing microcalcifications (n = 11, microcalcification group) and none (n = 10, control group) in stereotactic or ultrasound (US) guided 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. Photoacoustic (PA) images were acquired through ex vivo experiments by transmitting laser pulses with two different wavelengths (700 nm and 800 nm). The presence of microcalcifications in PA images were blindly assessed by two radiologists and compared with specimen mammography. A ratio of the signal amplitude occurring at 700 nm to that occurring at 800 nm was calculated for each PA focus and was called the PAI ratio. Results: Based on the change of PA signal amplitude between 700 nm and 800 nm, 10 out of 11 specimens containing microcalcifications and 8 out of 10 specimens without calcifications were correctly identified on blind review; the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive and negative predictive values of our blind review were 90.91%, 80.0%, 85.71%, 83.33% and 88.89%. The PAI ratio in the microcalcification group was significantly higher than that in the control group (the median PAI ratio, 2.46 versus 1.11, respectively, P = .001). On subgroup analysis in the microcalcification group, neither malignant diagnosis nor the number or size of calcification-foci was proven to contribute to PAI ratios. Conclusion: Breast microcalcifications generated distinguishable PA signals unlike breast tissue without calcifications. So, PAI, a non-ionizing and non-invasive hybrid imaging technique, can be an alternative in overcoming the limitations of conventional US imaging.

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