Physical activity and abdominal obesity in youth

Yoon-Myung Kim, So Jung Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood obesity continues to escalate despite considerable efforts to reverse the current trends. Childhood obesity is a leading public health concern because overweight-obese youth suffer from comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease, conditions once considered limited to adults. This increasing prevalence of chronic health conditions in youth closely parallels the dramatic increase in obesity, in particular abdominal adiposity, in youth. Although mounting evidence in adults demonstrates the benefits of regular physical activity as a treatment strategy for abdominal obesity, the independent role of regular physical activity alone (e.g., without calorie restriction) on abdominal obesity, and in particular visceral fat, is largely unclear in youth. There is some evidence to suggest that, independent of sedentary activity levels (e.g., television watching or playing video games), engaging in higher-intensity physical activity is associated with a lower waist circumference and less visceral fat. Several randomized controlled studies have shown that aerobic types of exercise are protective against age-related increases in visceral adiposity in growing children and adolescents. However, evidence regarding the effect of resistance training alone as a strategy for the treatment of abdominal obesity is lacking and warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-581
Number of pages11
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Aug 1

Fingerprint

Abdominal Obesity
Exercise
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Pediatric Obesity
Adiposity
Video Games
Resistance Training
Metabolic Diseases
Television
Waist Circumference
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Comorbidity
Cardiovascular Diseases
Public Health
Obesity
Health
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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Physical activity and abdominal obesity in youth. / Kim, Yoon-Myung; Lee, So Jung.

In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.08.2009, p. 571-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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