Phytosterols and lecithin do not have an additive effect in lowering plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats

Jonghyun Shin, Jung Kim Yun, Myung Sook Choi, Dong Ho Woo, Taesun Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both plant sterols and lecithin are used as dietary supplements for lowering blood cholesterol in Western countries. This study evaluated the possibility of an additive effect of these ingredients on the regulation of lipid concentrations and cholesterol metabolism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups, and fed one of the following diets for 5 weeks; high cholesterol diet (HCD), phytosterol mixture-supplemented diet (PD, HCD+0.25% phytosterols), or phytosterol mixture and lecithin-supplemented diet (PLD, PD+0.15% lecithin). Feeding the PD for 5 weeks resulted in a 34% and 41% decrease in plasma total- and VLDL+LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively, and a 23% decrease in hepatic cholesterol content compared to those for the HCD rats (p < 0.05). These cholesterol-lowering properties of the phytosterol mixture were also associated with the down-regulation of hepatic acyl CoA:cholesterol acytransferase (ACAT) activity (p < 0.05). Addition of lecithin plus phytosterol mixture to the hypercholesterolemic diet did not significantly affect blood and hepatic lipid concentrations (with the exception of 36% decrease in hepatic triglyceride level, p < 0.05) as well as hepatic ACAT activity compared to feeding the hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with phytosterol alone. These results indicate that combining lecithin, at a 0.15% level, with a phytosterol mixture-supplemented diet does not exhibit an additive effect in regulating hepatic ACAT activity or lowering blood cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic rats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-175
Number of pages3
JournalBioFactors
Volume22
Issue number1-4
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1

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Phytosterols
Lecithins
Nutrition
Rats
Cholesterol
Diet
Plasmas
Liver
Acyl Coenzyme A
Blood
Dietary supplements
Lipids
VLDL Cholesterol
Dietary Supplements
Metabolism
LDL Cholesterol
Sprague Dawley Rats
Triglycerides
Down-Regulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Phytosterols and lecithin do not have an additive effect in lowering plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats",
abstract = "Both plant sterols and lecithin are used as dietary supplements for lowering blood cholesterol in Western countries. This study evaluated the possibility of an additive effect of these ingredients on the regulation of lipid concentrations and cholesterol metabolism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups, and fed one of the following diets for 5 weeks; high cholesterol diet (HCD), phytosterol mixture-supplemented diet (PD, HCD+0.25{\%} phytosterols), or phytosterol mixture and lecithin-supplemented diet (PLD, PD+0.15{\%} lecithin). Feeding the PD for 5 weeks resulted in a 34{\%} and 41{\%} decrease in plasma total- and VLDL+LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively, and a 23{\%} decrease in hepatic cholesterol content compared to those for the HCD rats (p < 0.05). These cholesterol-lowering properties of the phytosterol mixture were also associated with the down-regulation of hepatic acyl CoA:cholesterol acytransferase (ACAT) activity (p < 0.05). Addition of lecithin plus phytosterol mixture to the hypercholesterolemic diet did not significantly affect blood and hepatic lipid concentrations (with the exception of 36{\%} decrease in hepatic triglyceride level, p < 0.05) as well as hepatic ACAT activity compared to feeding the hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with phytosterol alone. These results indicate that combining lecithin, at a 0.15{\%} level, with a phytosterol mixture-supplemented diet does not exhibit an additive effect in regulating hepatic ACAT activity or lowering blood cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic rats.",
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Phytosterols and lecithin do not have an additive effect in lowering plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats. / Shin, Jonghyun; Yun, Jung Kim; Choi, Myung Sook; Woo, Dong Ho; Park, Taesun.

In: BioFactors, Vol. 22, No. 1-4, 01.01.2005, p. 173-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Phytosterols and lecithin do not have an additive effect in lowering plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rats

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N2 - Both plant sterols and lecithin are used as dietary supplements for lowering blood cholesterol in Western countries. This study evaluated the possibility of an additive effect of these ingredients on the regulation of lipid concentrations and cholesterol metabolism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups, and fed one of the following diets for 5 weeks; high cholesterol diet (HCD), phytosterol mixture-supplemented diet (PD, HCD+0.25% phytosterols), or phytosterol mixture and lecithin-supplemented diet (PLD, PD+0.15% lecithin). Feeding the PD for 5 weeks resulted in a 34% and 41% decrease in plasma total- and VLDL+LDL-cholesterol levels, respectively, and a 23% decrease in hepatic cholesterol content compared to those for the HCD rats (p < 0.05). These cholesterol-lowering properties of the phytosterol mixture were also associated with the down-regulation of hepatic acyl CoA:cholesterol acytransferase (ACAT) activity (p < 0.05). Addition of lecithin plus phytosterol mixture to the hypercholesterolemic diet did not significantly affect blood and hepatic lipid concentrations (with the exception of 36% decrease in hepatic triglyceride level, p < 0.05) as well as hepatic ACAT activity compared to feeding the hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with phytosterol alone. These results indicate that combining lecithin, at a 0.15% level, with a phytosterol mixture-supplemented diet does not exhibit an additive effect in regulating hepatic ACAT activity or lowering blood cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic rats.

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