Polysialic acid engineering: Synthesis of polysialylated neoglycosphingolipids by using the polysialyltransferase from neuroinvasive Escherichia coli K1

Jin Won Cho, Frederic A. Troy

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Abstract

The CMP-sialic acid:polyα2,8sialosyl sialyltransferase (polyST) in neurotropic Escherichia coli K1 inner membranes catalyzes synthesis of the α2,8-linked polysialic acid capsule. The capsule is a neurovirulent determinant associated with neonatal meningitis in humans. A functionally similar polyST in human neuroblastomas polysialylates neural cell adhesion molecules. While bacteria do not synthesize glycosphingolipids (GSLs), we report here that the E. coli K1 polyST can selectively polysialylate several structurally related GSLs, when added as exogenous sialyl acceptors. A structural feature common to the preferred sialyl acceptors (G(D3) > G(T1a) > G(Q1b) = G(T1b) > G(D2) = G(D1b) = G(D1a) > G(M1)) was the disialyl glycotope, Siaα2,8Sia, α2,3-linked to galactose (Sia is sialic acid). A linear tetrasaccharide with a terminal Sia residue (e.g., G(D3)) was the minimum length oligosaccharide recognized by the polyST. Endo-N- acylneuraminidase was used to confirm the α2,8-specific polysialylation of GSL. Ceramide glycanase was used to release the polysialyllactose chains from the ceramide moiety. Size analysis of these chains showed that 60-80 Sia residues were transferred to the disialyllactose moiety of G(D3). The significance of these findings is two-fold. (i) The E. coli K1 polyST can be used as a synthetic reagent to enzymatically engineer the glycosyl moiety of GSL, thus creating oligo- or polysialylated GSLs. Such 'designer' GSLs may have potentially important biological and pharmacological properties. (ii) The use of GSLs as exogenous sialyl acceptors increases the sensitivity of detecting polyST activity. The practical advantage of this finding is that polyST activity can be identified and studied in those eukaryotic cells that express low levels of this developmentally regulated enzyme and/or its acceptor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11427-11431
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume91
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994 Nov 22

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Sialyltransferases
Glycosphingolipids
Escherichia coli
Capsules
Cytidine Monophosphate N-Acetylneuraminic Acid
Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules
Ceramides
Eukaryotic Cells
N-Acetylneuraminic Acid
polysialic acid
Oligosaccharides
Neuroblastoma
Galactose
Meningitis
Pharmacology
Bacteria
Membranes
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

@article{44f7297fd7a745a5abcd6d9e4d4f30a4,
title = "Polysialic acid engineering: Synthesis of polysialylated neoglycosphingolipids by using the polysialyltransferase from neuroinvasive Escherichia coli K1",
abstract = "The CMP-sialic acid:polyα2,8sialosyl sialyltransferase (polyST) in neurotropic Escherichia coli K1 inner membranes catalyzes synthesis of the α2,8-linked polysialic acid capsule. The capsule is a neurovirulent determinant associated with neonatal meningitis in humans. A functionally similar polyST in human neuroblastomas polysialylates neural cell adhesion molecules. While bacteria do not synthesize glycosphingolipids (GSLs), we report here that the E. coli K1 polyST can selectively polysialylate several structurally related GSLs, when added as exogenous sialyl acceptors. A structural feature common to the preferred sialyl acceptors (G(D3) > G(T1a) > G(Q1b) = G(T1b) > G(D2) = G(D1b) = G(D1a) > G(M1)) was the disialyl glycotope, Siaα2,8Sia, α2,3-linked to galactose (Sia is sialic acid). A linear tetrasaccharide with a terminal Sia residue (e.g., G(D3)) was the minimum length oligosaccharide recognized by the polyST. Endo-N- acylneuraminidase was used to confirm the α2,8-specific polysialylation of GSL. Ceramide glycanase was used to release the polysialyllactose chains from the ceramide moiety. Size analysis of these chains showed that 60-80 Sia residues were transferred to the disialyllactose moiety of G(D3). The significance of these findings is two-fold. (i) The E. coli K1 polyST can be used as a synthetic reagent to enzymatically engineer the glycosyl moiety of GSL, thus creating oligo- or polysialylated GSLs. Such 'designer' GSLs may have potentially important biological and pharmacological properties. (ii) The use of GSLs as exogenous sialyl acceptors increases the sensitivity of detecting polyST activity. The practical advantage of this finding is that polyST activity can be identified and studied in those eukaryotic cells that express low levels of this developmentally regulated enzyme and/or its acceptor.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Polysialic acid engineering

T2 - Synthesis of polysialylated neoglycosphingolipids by using the polysialyltransferase from neuroinvasive Escherichia coli K1

AU - Cho, Jin Won

AU - Troy, Frederic A.

PY - 1994/11/22

Y1 - 1994/11/22

N2 - The CMP-sialic acid:polyα2,8sialosyl sialyltransferase (polyST) in neurotropic Escherichia coli K1 inner membranes catalyzes synthesis of the α2,8-linked polysialic acid capsule. The capsule is a neurovirulent determinant associated with neonatal meningitis in humans. A functionally similar polyST in human neuroblastomas polysialylates neural cell adhesion molecules. While bacteria do not synthesize glycosphingolipids (GSLs), we report here that the E. coli K1 polyST can selectively polysialylate several structurally related GSLs, when added as exogenous sialyl acceptors. A structural feature common to the preferred sialyl acceptors (G(D3) > G(T1a) > G(Q1b) = G(T1b) > G(D2) = G(D1b) = G(D1a) > G(M1)) was the disialyl glycotope, Siaα2,8Sia, α2,3-linked to galactose (Sia is sialic acid). A linear tetrasaccharide with a terminal Sia residue (e.g., G(D3)) was the minimum length oligosaccharide recognized by the polyST. Endo-N- acylneuraminidase was used to confirm the α2,8-specific polysialylation of GSL. Ceramide glycanase was used to release the polysialyllactose chains from the ceramide moiety. Size analysis of these chains showed that 60-80 Sia residues were transferred to the disialyllactose moiety of G(D3). The significance of these findings is two-fold. (i) The E. coli K1 polyST can be used as a synthetic reagent to enzymatically engineer the glycosyl moiety of GSL, thus creating oligo- or polysialylated GSLs. Such 'designer' GSLs may have potentially important biological and pharmacological properties. (ii) The use of GSLs as exogenous sialyl acceptors increases the sensitivity of detecting polyST activity. The practical advantage of this finding is that polyST activity can be identified and studied in those eukaryotic cells that express low levels of this developmentally regulated enzyme and/or its acceptor.

AB - The CMP-sialic acid:polyα2,8sialosyl sialyltransferase (polyST) in neurotropic Escherichia coli K1 inner membranes catalyzes synthesis of the α2,8-linked polysialic acid capsule. The capsule is a neurovirulent determinant associated with neonatal meningitis in humans. A functionally similar polyST in human neuroblastomas polysialylates neural cell adhesion molecules. While bacteria do not synthesize glycosphingolipids (GSLs), we report here that the E. coli K1 polyST can selectively polysialylate several structurally related GSLs, when added as exogenous sialyl acceptors. A structural feature common to the preferred sialyl acceptors (G(D3) > G(T1a) > G(Q1b) = G(T1b) > G(D2) = G(D1b) = G(D1a) > G(M1)) was the disialyl glycotope, Siaα2,8Sia, α2,3-linked to galactose (Sia is sialic acid). A linear tetrasaccharide with a terminal Sia residue (e.g., G(D3)) was the minimum length oligosaccharide recognized by the polyST. Endo-N- acylneuraminidase was used to confirm the α2,8-specific polysialylation of GSL. Ceramide glycanase was used to release the polysialyllactose chains from the ceramide moiety. Size analysis of these chains showed that 60-80 Sia residues were transferred to the disialyllactose moiety of G(D3). The significance of these findings is two-fold. (i) The E. coli K1 polyST can be used as a synthetic reagent to enzymatically engineer the glycosyl moiety of GSL, thus creating oligo- or polysialylated GSLs. Such 'designer' GSLs may have potentially important biological and pharmacological properties. (ii) The use of GSLs as exogenous sialyl acceptors increases the sensitivity of detecting polyST activity. The practical advantage of this finding is that polyST activity can be identified and studied in those eukaryotic cells that express low levels of this developmentally regulated enzyme and/or its acceptor.

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