Poor sleep and reactive aggression

Results from a national sample ofAfrican American adults

Michael George Vaughn, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Norman A. White, Kristen P. Kremer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We know that poor sleep can have important implications for a variety of health outcomes and some evidence suggests a link between sleep and aggressive behavior. However, few studies have looked at this relationship among African-Americans in the United States. Methods: Data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL) and the NSAL Adult Re-Interview were used to examine associations between sleep duration and self-reported quality of sleep on reactive aggression among African American and Caribbean Black respondents between the ages of 18 and 65 (n=2499). Results: Controlling for an array of sociodemographic and psychiatric factors, sleep was found to be significantly associated with reactive aggression. Specifically, individuals who reported sleeping on average less than 5h per night were nearly three times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in a physical fight (AOR=3.13, 95% CI=1.22-8.02). Moreover, individuals who reported being "very dissatisfied" with their sleep were more than two times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in physical fights (AOR=3.32, 95% CI=1.50-7.33). Persons reporting everyday discrimination and problems managing stress were more likely to sleep poorly. Conclusions: The present study is among the first to document an association between poor sleep and reactive violence among African-Americans. Findings suggest that reducing discrimination may lead to improved sleep and subsequently reduce forms of reactive violence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-59
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume66-67
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Aggression
Sleep
African Americans
Violence
Psychiatry
Interviews
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Vaughn, Michael George ; Salas-Wright, Christopher P. ; White, Norman A. ; Kremer, Kristen P. / Poor sleep and reactive aggression : Results from a national sample ofAfrican American adults. In: Journal of Psychiatric Research. 2015 ; Vol. 66-67. pp. 54-59.
@article{72b3578faa054f7480c0eaf54b3674a6,
title = "Poor sleep and reactive aggression: Results from a national sample ofAfrican American adults",
abstract = "Background: We know that poor sleep can have important implications for a variety of health outcomes and some evidence suggests a link between sleep and aggressive behavior. However, few studies have looked at this relationship among African-Americans in the United States. Methods: Data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL) and the NSAL Adult Re-Interview were used to examine associations between sleep duration and self-reported quality of sleep on reactive aggression among African American and Caribbean Black respondents between the ages of 18 and 65 (n=2499). Results: Controlling for an array of sociodemographic and psychiatric factors, sleep was found to be significantly associated with reactive aggression. Specifically, individuals who reported sleeping on average less than 5h per night were nearly three times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in a physical fight (AOR=3.13, 95{\%} CI=1.22-8.02). Moreover, individuals who reported being {"}very dissatisfied{"} with their sleep were more than two times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in physical fights (AOR=3.32, 95{\%} CI=1.50-7.33). Persons reporting everyday discrimination and problems managing stress were more likely to sleep poorly. Conclusions: The present study is among the first to document an association between poor sleep and reactive violence among African-Americans. Findings suggest that reducing discrimination may lead to improved sleep and subsequently reduce forms of reactive violence.",
author = "Vaughn, {Michael George} and Salas-Wright, {Christopher P.} and White, {Norman A.} and Kremer, {Kristen P.}",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.04.015",
language = "English",
volume = "66-67",
pages = "54--59",
journal = "Journal of Psychiatric Research",
issn = "0022-3956",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Poor sleep and reactive aggression : Results from a national sample ofAfrican American adults. / Vaughn, Michael George; Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; White, Norman A.; Kremer, Kristen P.

In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, Vol. 66-67, 01.07.2015, p. 54-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Poor sleep and reactive aggression

T2 - Results from a national sample ofAfrican American adults

AU - Vaughn, Michael George

AU - Salas-Wright, Christopher P.

AU - White, Norman A.

AU - Kremer, Kristen P.

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Background: We know that poor sleep can have important implications for a variety of health outcomes and some evidence suggests a link between sleep and aggressive behavior. However, few studies have looked at this relationship among African-Americans in the United States. Methods: Data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL) and the NSAL Adult Re-Interview were used to examine associations between sleep duration and self-reported quality of sleep on reactive aggression among African American and Caribbean Black respondents between the ages of 18 and 65 (n=2499). Results: Controlling for an array of sociodemographic and psychiatric factors, sleep was found to be significantly associated with reactive aggression. Specifically, individuals who reported sleeping on average less than 5h per night were nearly three times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in a physical fight (AOR=3.13, 95% CI=1.22-8.02). Moreover, individuals who reported being "very dissatisfied" with their sleep were more than two times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in physical fights (AOR=3.32, 95% CI=1.50-7.33). Persons reporting everyday discrimination and problems managing stress were more likely to sleep poorly. Conclusions: The present study is among the first to document an association between poor sleep and reactive violence among African-Americans. Findings suggest that reducing discrimination may lead to improved sleep and subsequently reduce forms of reactive violence.

AB - Background: We know that poor sleep can have important implications for a variety of health outcomes and some evidence suggests a link between sleep and aggressive behavior. However, few studies have looked at this relationship among African-Americans in the United States. Methods: Data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL) and the NSAL Adult Re-Interview were used to examine associations between sleep duration and self-reported quality of sleep on reactive aggression among African American and Caribbean Black respondents between the ages of 18 and 65 (n=2499). Results: Controlling for an array of sociodemographic and psychiatric factors, sleep was found to be significantly associated with reactive aggression. Specifically, individuals who reported sleeping on average less than 5h per night were nearly three times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in a physical fight (AOR=3.13, 95% CI=1.22-8.02). Moreover, individuals who reported being "very dissatisfied" with their sleep were more than two times more likely to report losing their temper and engaging in physical fights (AOR=3.32, 95% CI=1.50-7.33). Persons reporting everyday discrimination and problems managing stress were more likely to sleep poorly. Conclusions: The present study is among the first to document an association between poor sleep and reactive violence among African-Americans. Findings suggest that reducing discrimination may lead to improved sleep and subsequently reduce forms of reactive violence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930538429&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930538429&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.04.015

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.04.015

M3 - Article

VL - 66-67

SP - 54

EP - 59

JO - Journal of Psychiatric Research

JF - Journal of Psychiatric Research

SN - 0022-3956

ER -