Predicting H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs: The role of individual difference in consideration of future consequences

Xiaoli Nan, Jarim Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research examines the influence of individual difference in consideration of future consequences on H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs (i.e., perceived susceptibility to and severity of the H1N1 flu, perceived efficacy and safety of the H1N1 vaccine, and perceived self-efficacy in obtaining the H1N1 vaccine). A survey of 411 college students showed that consideration of future consequences had no direct effect on vaccine uptake, but higher consideration of future consequences was associated with greater perceived severity of the flu, higher perceived effectiveness of the vaccine, and greater perceived self-efficacy. Additional analysis suggested that consideration of future consequences had a significant indirect effect on vaccine uptake through perceived vaccine efficacy. Results of the study also revealed gender and racial differences in some of the H1N1-related health beliefs. Implications of the findings for vaccine risk communication are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-388
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Mar 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

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