Prediction of early clinical severity and extent of neuronal damage in anterior-circulation infarction using the initial serum neuron-specific enolase level

Seung Hun Oh, Jin Goo Lee, Sang Jun Na, Ji Hyung Park, Young Chul Choi, Won Joo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Prompt and precise measurement of neuronal damage in acute cerebral infarction is important to determine the prognosis of functional outcome. A feasible biochemical marker such as the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level has been used to detect various diseases involving the central nervous system. Objective: To determine whether the initial serum NSE level is a useful marker for predicting the severity of clinical neurological deficits and the extent of neuronal damage in acute anterior-circulation infarction. Design: Case-control study with biochemical-clinicoradiological correlation. Setting: Tertiary care center. Participants: Eighty-one patients and 77 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Patients with anterior-circulation infarction underwent intravenous serum NSE sampling within 24 hours after symptom onset. Recent infarction was confirmed by T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain about 1 week after the onset of stroke. Volumetric analysis of infarction was also performed. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was measured on admission to the hospital and 1 week after symptom onset. Results: The patients' initial serum NSE levels were statistically significantly higher than the controls (P<.05). The initial serum NSE level highly correlated with the volume of infarction seen on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (r=0.62, P<.001) and with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score obtained on hospital admission (r=0.42, P=.002) and on the seventh day after the onset of stroke (r=0.44, P<.001). Conclusion: The initial serum NSE level is a reliable predictor for the extent of neuronal damage and the severity of clinical neurological deficits in acute anterior-circulation infarction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-41
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jan 1

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Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
Infarction
Serum
Stroke
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Central Nervous System Diseases
Cerebral Infarction
Brain
Tertiary Care Centers
Neuron
Prediction
Damage
Case-Control Studies
Biomarkers
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Onset

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Prediction of early clinical severity and extent of neuronal damage in anterior-circulation infarction using the initial serum neuron-specific enolase level",
abstract = "Context: Prompt and precise measurement of neuronal damage in acute cerebral infarction is important to determine the prognosis of functional outcome. A feasible biochemical marker such as the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level has been used to detect various diseases involving the central nervous system. Objective: To determine whether the initial serum NSE level is a useful marker for predicting the severity of clinical neurological deficits and the extent of neuronal damage in acute anterior-circulation infarction. Design: Case-control study with biochemical-clinicoradiological correlation. Setting: Tertiary care center. Participants: Eighty-one patients and 77 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Patients with anterior-circulation infarction underwent intravenous serum NSE sampling within 24 hours after symptom onset. Recent infarction was confirmed by T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain about 1 week after the onset of stroke. Volumetric analysis of infarction was also performed. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was measured on admission to the hospital and 1 week after symptom onset. Results: The patients' initial serum NSE levels were statistically significantly higher than the controls (P<.05). The initial serum NSE level highly correlated with the volume of infarction seen on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (r=0.62, P<.001) and with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score obtained on hospital admission (r=0.42, P=.002) and on the seventh day after the onset of stroke (r=0.44, P<.001). Conclusion: The initial serum NSE level is a reliable predictor for the extent of neuronal damage and the severity of clinical neurological deficits in acute anterior-circulation infarction.",
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Prediction of early clinical severity and extent of neuronal damage in anterior-circulation infarction using the initial serum neuron-specific enolase level. / Oh, Seung Hun; Lee, Jin Goo; Na, Sang Jun; Park, Ji Hyung; Choi, Young Chul; Kim, Won Joo.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 60, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 37-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Prediction of early clinical severity and extent of neuronal damage in anterior-circulation infarction using the initial serum neuron-specific enolase level

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AU - Choi, Young Chul

AU - Kim, Won Joo

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N2 - Context: Prompt and precise measurement of neuronal damage in acute cerebral infarction is important to determine the prognosis of functional outcome. A feasible biochemical marker such as the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level has been used to detect various diseases involving the central nervous system. Objective: To determine whether the initial serum NSE level is a useful marker for predicting the severity of clinical neurological deficits and the extent of neuronal damage in acute anterior-circulation infarction. Design: Case-control study with biochemical-clinicoradiological correlation. Setting: Tertiary care center. Participants: Eighty-one patients and 77 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Patients with anterior-circulation infarction underwent intravenous serum NSE sampling within 24 hours after symptom onset. Recent infarction was confirmed by T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain about 1 week after the onset of stroke. Volumetric analysis of infarction was also performed. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was measured on admission to the hospital and 1 week after symptom onset. Results: The patients' initial serum NSE levels were statistically significantly higher than the controls (P<.05). The initial serum NSE level highly correlated with the volume of infarction seen on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (r=0.62, P<.001) and with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score obtained on hospital admission (r=0.42, P=.002) and on the seventh day after the onset of stroke (r=0.44, P<.001). Conclusion: The initial serum NSE level is a reliable predictor for the extent of neuronal damage and the severity of clinical neurological deficits in acute anterior-circulation infarction.

AB - Context: Prompt and precise measurement of neuronal damage in acute cerebral infarction is important to determine the prognosis of functional outcome. A feasible biochemical marker such as the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level has been used to detect various diseases involving the central nervous system. Objective: To determine whether the initial serum NSE level is a useful marker for predicting the severity of clinical neurological deficits and the extent of neuronal damage in acute anterior-circulation infarction. Design: Case-control study with biochemical-clinicoradiological correlation. Setting: Tertiary care center. Participants: Eighty-one patients and 77 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Patients with anterior-circulation infarction underwent intravenous serum NSE sampling within 24 hours after symptom onset. Recent infarction was confirmed by T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain about 1 week after the onset of stroke. Volumetric analysis of infarction was also performed. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was measured on admission to the hospital and 1 week after symptom onset. Results: The patients' initial serum NSE levels were statistically significantly higher than the controls (P<.05). The initial serum NSE level highly correlated with the volume of infarction seen on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (r=0.62, P<.001) and with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score obtained on hospital admission (r=0.42, P=.002) and on the seventh day after the onset of stroke (r=0.44, P<.001). Conclusion: The initial serum NSE level is a reliable predictor for the extent of neuronal damage and the severity of clinical neurological deficits in acute anterior-circulation infarction.

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