Predictive processing of implicit causality in a second language: A visual-world eye-tracking study

Hyunwoo Kim, Theres Grüter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Implicit causality (IC) is a well-known phenomenon whereby certain verbs appear to create biases to remention either their subject or object in a causal dependent clause. This study investigated to what extent Korean learners of English made use of IC information for predictive processing at a discourse level, and whether L2 proficiency played a modulating role in this process. Results from a visual-world eye-tracking experiment showed early use of IC information in both L1 and L2 listeners, yet the effect was weaker and emerged later in the L2 group. None of three independent and intercorrelated proficiency measures modulated L2 listeners’ processing behavior. The findings suggest that L2 listeners are able to engage in prediction during real-time processing at a discourse level, although they did so to a more limited extent than native speakers in this study. We discuss these findings in light of similar evidence from other recent work.
Original languageEnglish
Article number43
Pages (from-to)133-154
JournalStudies in Second Language Acquisition
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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