Pregnancy and Intimate Partner Violence in Canada

a Comparison of Victims Who Were and Were Not Abused During Pregnancy

Tamara L. Taillieu, Douglas A. Brownridge, Kimberly A. Tyler, Edward Ko Ling Chan, Agnes Tiwari, Susy C. Santos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors, indicators of severity, and differences in post-violence health effects for victims who experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy compared to victims who experienced IPV outside the pregnancy period. Data were from Statistics Canada’s 2009 General Social Survey. Among IPV victims, 10.5 % experienced physical and/or sexual violence during pregnancy. Victims who had experienced violence during pregnancy were more likely than victims who were not abused during pregnancy to experience both less severe and more severe forms of violence. In fully adjusted models, younger age, separated or divorced marital status, as well as partners’ patriarchal domination, destruction of property, and drinking were significant predictors of pregnancy violence. Measures indicative of more severe violence and of a number of adverse post-violence health effects were significantly elevated among victims who experienced pregnancy violence relative to victims who were not abused during pregnancy. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)567-579
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Family Violence
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Canada
pregnancy
Violence
violence
Pregnancy
Divorce
Intimate Partner Violence
Sex Offenses
Health
Marital Status
Drinking
health
marital status
domination
sexual violence
statistics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Taillieu, Tamara L. ; Brownridge, Douglas A. ; Tyler, Kimberly A. ; Chan, Edward Ko Ling ; Tiwari, Agnes ; Santos, Susy C. / Pregnancy and Intimate Partner Violence in Canada : a Comparison of Victims Who Were and Were Not Abused During Pregnancy. In: Journal of Family Violence. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 567-579.
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Pregnancy and Intimate Partner Violence in Canada : a Comparison of Victims Who Were and Were Not Abused During Pregnancy. / Taillieu, Tamara L.; Brownridge, Douglas A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Chan, Edward Ko Ling; Tiwari, Agnes; Santos, Susy C.

In: Journal of Family Violence, Vol. 31, No. 5, 01.07.2016, p. 567-579.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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