Prevalence and Correlates of the Co-Occurrence of Family Violence: A Meta-Analysis on Family Polyvictimization

Ko Ling Chan, Qiqi Chen, Mengtong Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objective: The aims of this study are to (a) provide reliable estimates of prevalence rates of family polyvictimization by synthesizing the findings from the existing literature, (b) examine the effect sizes of the impact of one type of family victimization on other types of family victimization, and (c) investigate the correlates of family polyvictimization. Method: Databases of literature published on or before April 2018 were searched. A total of 59 publications met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis for the combined odds ratios (ORs) to estimate the associations among different types of family victimization; 38 of them (99,956 participants) were used for the calculation of the combined prevalence rates of family polyvictimization. Findings: The overall co-occurrence rates of family victimization were 9.7% among the general population and 36.0% among the clinical population. The combined OR of other type(s) of victimization when one was present was 6.01 (p <.001). Longitudinal studies show that, when a family reported intimate partner violence, the odds of child abuse and neglect within the same family at a later stage was 3.64 (p <.001). Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder were two significant correlates associated with family polyvictimization. Conclusion: Family polyvictimization is prevalent across the world. The high co-occurrence rates and strong associations between different types of victimization on different family members warrant the need for the early detection of victims and effective preventions and interventions using a family approach, instead of treating victims from the same family individually.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTrauma, Violence, and Abuse
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Domestic Violence
Meta-Analysis
violence
Crime Victims
victimization
Child Abuse
Odds Ratio
abuse of children
posttraumatic stress disorder
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
family member
neglect
Population
longitudinal study
Longitudinal Studies
Publications

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{ff6719427fe642d6be8fed10e58307e8,
title = "Prevalence and Correlates of the Co-Occurrence of Family Violence: A Meta-Analysis on Family Polyvictimization",
abstract = "Objective: The aims of this study are to (a) provide reliable estimates of prevalence rates of family polyvictimization by synthesizing the findings from the existing literature, (b) examine the effect sizes of the impact of one type of family victimization on other types of family victimization, and (c) investigate the correlates of family polyvictimization. Method: Databases of literature published on or before April 2018 were searched. A total of 59 publications met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis for the combined odds ratios (ORs) to estimate the associations among different types of family victimization; 38 of them (99,956 participants) were used for the calculation of the combined prevalence rates of family polyvictimization. Findings: The overall co-occurrence rates of family victimization were 9.7{\%} among the general population and 36.0{\%} among the clinical population. The combined OR of other type(s) of victimization when one was present was 6.01 (p <.001). Longitudinal studies show that, when a family reported intimate partner violence, the odds of child abuse and neglect within the same family at a later stage was 3.64 (p <.001). Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder were two significant correlates associated with family polyvictimization. Conclusion: Family polyvictimization is prevalent across the world. The high co-occurrence rates and strong associations between different types of victimization on different family members warrant the need for the early detection of victims and effective preventions and interventions using a family approach, instead of treating victims from the same family individually.",
author = "Chan, {Ko Ling} and Qiqi Chen and Mengtong Chen",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1524838019841601",
language = "English",
journal = "Trauma, Violence, and Abuse",
issn = "1524-8380",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

Prevalence and Correlates of the Co-Occurrence of Family Violence : A Meta-Analysis on Family Polyvictimization. / Chan, Ko Ling; Chen, Qiqi; Chen, Mengtong.

In: Trauma, Violence, and Abuse, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and Correlates of the Co-Occurrence of Family Violence

T2 - A Meta-Analysis on Family Polyvictimization

AU - Chan, Ko Ling

AU - Chen, Qiqi

AU - Chen, Mengtong

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: The aims of this study are to (a) provide reliable estimates of prevalence rates of family polyvictimization by synthesizing the findings from the existing literature, (b) examine the effect sizes of the impact of one type of family victimization on other types of family victimization, and (c) investigate the correlates of family polyvictimization. Method: Databases of literature published on or before April 2018 were searched. A total of 59 publications met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis for the combined odds ratios (ORs) to estimate the associations among different types of family victimization; 38 of them (99,956 participants) were used for the calculation of the combined prevalence rates of family polyvictimization. Findings: The overall co-occurrence rates of family victimization were 9.7% among the general population and 36.0% among the clinical population. The combined OR of other type(s) of victimization when one was present was 6.01 (p <.001). Longitudinal studies show that, when a family reported intimate partner violence, the odds of child abuse and neglect within the same family at a later stage was 3.64 (p <.001). Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder were two significant correlates associated with family polyvictimization. Conclusion: Family polyvictimization is prevalent across the world. The high co-occurrence rates and strong associations between different types of victimization on different family members warrant the need for the early detection of victims and effective preventions and interventions using a family approach, instead of treating victims from the same family individually.

AB - Objective: The aims of this study are to (a) provide reliable estimates of prevalence rates of family polyvictimization by synthesizing the findings from the existing literature, (b) examine the effect sizes of the impact of one type of family victimization on other types of family victimization, and (c) investigate the correlates of family polyvictimization. Method: Databases of literature published on or before April 2018 were searched. A total of 59 publications met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis for the combined odds ratios (ORs) to estimate the associations among different types of family victimization; 38 of them (99,956 participants) were used for the calculation of the combined prevalence rates of family polyvictimization. Findings: The overall co-occurrence rates of family victimization were 9.7% among the general population and 36.0% among the clinical population. The combined OR of other type(s) of victimization when one was present was 6.01 (p <.001). Longitudinal studies show that, when a family reported intimate partner violence, the odds of child abuse and neglect within the same family at a later stage was 3.64 (p <.001). Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder were two significant correlates associated with family polyvictimization. Conclusion: Family polyvictimization is prevalent across the world. The high co-occurrence rates and strong associations between different types of victimization on different family members warrant the need for the early detection of victims and effective preventions and interventions using a family approach, instead of treating victims from the same family individually.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065639478&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065639478&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1524838019841601

DO - 10.1177/1524838019841601

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:85065639478

JO - Trauma, Violence, and Abuse

JF - Trauma, Violence, and Abuse

SN - 1524-8380

ER -