Prevalence and prognostic implications of psychological distress in patients with gastric cancer

Gun Min Kim, Seung Jun Kim, Su Kyung Song, Hye Ryun Kim, Beo Deul Kang, Sung Hoon Noh, Hyun Cheol Chung, Kyung Ran Kim, Sun Young Rha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and prognostic significance of psychological distress in gastric cancer patients. Methods: The study population included 229 gastric cancer patients visiting Yonsei Cancer Center between November 2009 and March 2011. The distress was measured by available tools including the Modified Distress Thermometer (MDT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Patients with psychological distress were defined as those who scored above the cut-off values in both the MDT and either one of the HADS or CES-D. Results: The median age of patients was 56 (range, 20 to 86) and 97 (42.4%) patients were with stage IV disease status at enrollment. The overall prevalence of psychological distress was 33.6% (95% CI: 27.5-39.8%) in 229 gastric cancer patients. In multiple logistic regression analysis, lower education level (odds ratio [OR] 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-5.17, P=0.026) and higher disease stage (OR 2.72; 95% CI 1.47-5.03, P=0.001) were associated with psychological distress. In stage I-III disease, patients with psychological distress had worse disease-free survival (DFS) (5-year DFS rate: 60% vs 76%, P=0.49) compared with those without psychological distress. In stage IV disease (n=97), patients with psychological distress showed poorer overall survival than those without psychological distress (median OS (Overall Survival): 12.2 vs. 13.8months, P=0.019). Conclusion: Psychological distress is common in patients with all stages of gastric cancer and is associated with worse outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number283
JournalBMC cancer
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Apr 20

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Stomach Neoplasms
Psychology
Thermometers
Confidence Intervals
Depression
Disease-Free Survival
Anxiety
Odds Ratio
Survival
Epidemiologic Studies
Survival Rate
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Education
Population
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Kim, Gun Min ; Kim, Seung Jun ; Song, Su Kyung ; Kim, Hye Ryun ; Kang, Beo Deul ; Noh, Sung Hoon ; Chung, Hyun Cheol ; Kim, Kyung Ran ; Rha, Sun Young. / Prevalence and prognostic implications of psychological distress in patients with gastric cancer. In: BMC cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 1.
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title = "Prevalence and prognostic implications of psychological distress in patients with gastric cancer",
abstract = "Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and prognostic significance of psychological distress in gastric cancer patients. Methods: The study population included 229 gastric cancer patients visiting Yonsei Cancer Center between November 2009 and March 2011. The distress was measured by available tools including the Modified Distress Thermometer (MDT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Patients with psychological distress were defined as those who scored above the cut-off values in both the MDT and either one of the HADS or CES-D. Results: The median age of patients was 56 (range, 20 to 86) and 97 (42.4{\%}) patients were with stage IV disease status at enrollment. The overall prevalence of psychological distress was 33.6{\%} (95{\%} CI: 27.5-39.8{\%}) in 229 gastric cancer patients. In multiple logistic regression analysis, lower education level (odds ratio [OR] 2.39; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.11-5.17, P=0.026) and higher disease stage (OR 2.72; 95{\%} CI 1.47-5.03, P=0.001) were associated with psychological distress. In stage I-III disease, patients with psychological distress had worse disease-free survival (DFS) (5-year DFS rate: 60{\%} vs 76{\%}, P=0.49) compared with those without psychological distress. In stage IV disease (n=97), patients with psychological distress showed poorer overall survival than those without psychological distress (median OS (Overall Survival): 12.2 vs. 13.8months, P=0.019). Conclusion: Psychological distress is common in patients with all stages of gastric cancer and is associated with worse outcomes.",
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Prevalence and prognostic implications of psychological distress in patients with gastric cancer. / Kim, Gun Min; Kim, Seung Jun; Song, Su Kyung; Kim, Hye Ryun; Kang, Beo Deul; Noh, Sung Hoon; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Kyung Ran; Rha, Sun Young.

In: BMC cancer, Vol. 17, No. 1, 283, 20.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and prognostic implications of psychological distress in patients with gastric cancer

AU - Kim, Gun Min

AU - Kim, Seung Jun

AU - Song, Su Kyung

AU - Kim, Hye Ryun

AU - Kang, Beo Deul

AU - Noh, Sung Hoon

AU - Chung, Hyun Cheol

AU - Kim, Kyung Ran

AU - Rha, Sun Young

PY - 2017/4/20

Y1 - 2017/4/20

N2 - Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and prognostic significance of psychological distress in gastric cancer patients. Methods: The study population included 229 gastric cancer patients visiting Yonsei Cancer Center between November 2009 and March 2011. The distress was measured by available tools including the Modified Distress Thermometer (MDT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Patients with psychological distress were defined as those who scored above the cut-off values in both the MDT and either one of the HADS or CES-D. Results: The median age of patients was 56 (range, 20 to 86) and 97 (42.4%) patients were with stage IV disease status at enrollment. The overall prevalence of psychological distress was 33.6% (95% CI: 27.5-39.8%) in 229 gastric cancer patients. In multiple logistic regression analysis, lower education level (odds ratio [OR] 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-5.17, P=0.026) and higher disease stage (OR 2.72; 95% CI 1.47-5.03, P=0.001) were associated with psychological distress. In stage I-III disease, patients with psychological distress had worse disease-free survival (DFS) (5-year DFS rate: 60% vs 76%, P=0.49) compared with those without psychological distress. In stage IV disease (n=97), patients with psychological distress showed poorer overall survival than those without psychological distress (median OS (Overall Survival): 12.2 vs. 13.8months, P=0.019). Conclusion: Psychological distress is common in patients with all stages of gastric cancer and is associated with worse outcomes.

AB - Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and prognostic significance of psychological distress in gastric cancer patients. Methods: The study population included 229 gastric cancer patients visiting Yonsei Cancer Center between November 2009 and March 2011. The distress was measured by available tools including the Modified Distress Thermometer (MDT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Patients with psychological distress were defined as those who scored above the cut-off values in both the MDT and either one of the HADS or CES-D. Results: The median age of patients was 56 (range, 20 to 86) and 97 (42.4%) patients were with stage IV disease status at enrollment. The overall prevalence of psychological distress was 33.6% (95% CI: 27.5-39.8%) in 229 gastric cancer patients. In multiple logistic regression analysis, lower education level (odds ratio [OR] 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-5.17, P=0.026) and higher disease stage (OR 2.72; 95% CI 1.47-5.03, P=0.001) were associated with psychological distress. In stage I-III disease, patients with psychological distress had worse disease-free survival (DFS) (5-year DFS rate: 60% vs 76%, P=0.49) compared with those without psychological distress. In stage IV disease (n=97), patients with psychological distress showed poorer overall survival than those without psychological distress (median OS (Overall Survival): 12.2 vs. 13.8months, P=0.019). Conclusion: Psychological distress is common in patients with all stages of gastric cancer and is associated with worse outcomes.

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U2 - 10.1186/s12885-017-3260-2

DO - 10.1186/s12885-017-3260-2

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