Problem-Focused Coping Mediates the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Mental Health among Chinese Women

Janet Yuen Ha Wong, Daniel Yee Tak Fong, Anna Wai Man Choi, Agnes Tiwari, Ko Ling Chan, T. K. Logan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our study focused on understanding on the ways that abused Chinese women cope and aimed to examine the mediating role of coping strategies between the relationships of intimate partner violence (IPV; including partner stalking) and mental health problems. Method: A population-based household survey was completed by 550 Chinese community-dwelling women. Data on the mediating roles of coping strategies were examined using structural equation models. Results: The prevalence of IPV among Chinese women was 22.9% for psychological abuse, 6.5% for physical abuse, 2.2% for sexual abuse, and 4.2% for partner stalking in the past year. Abused women used more active coping (p = .01), planning (p = .006), and self-distraction (p = .02) than nonabused women. Results supported the mediating effect of problem-focused and passive coping strategies, but not emotion-focused coping, in the pathways of IPV and mental health outcomes (root mean squared error of approximation = .063, comparative fit index = .93, Tucker-Lewis index = .91, and standardized root mean squared residual = .06). Negative mental health outcomes significantly decreased by problem-focused coping (β =-5.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] =-9.56,-.77, p = .021) and significantly increased by passive coping (β = 4.72, 95% CI = 1.24, 8.19, p = .008). Conclusions: Abused women used multifaceted types of coping. Both problem-focused and passive coping mediated the IPV-mental health outcomes link. The findings reinforced the importance of helping abused women find practical ways to cope with IPV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-322
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology of Violence
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Apr 1

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Battered Women
Mental Health
coping
Stalking
mental health
violence
Confidence Intervals
Independent Living
stalking
Structural Models
Sex Offenses
Emotions
abuse
Psychology
confidence
Intimate Partner Violence
household survey
Population
structural model
sexual violence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Wong, J. Y. H., Fong, D. Y. T., Choi, A. W. M., Tiwari, A., Chan, K. L., & Logan, T. K. (2016). Problem-Focused Coping Mediates the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Mental Health among Chinese Women. Psychology of Violence, 6(2), 313-322. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0039496
Wong, Janet Yuen Ha ; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak ; Choi, Anna Wai Man ; Tiwari, Agnes ; Chan, Ko Ling ; Logan, T. K. / Problem-Focused Coping Mediates the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Mental Health among Chinese Women. In: Psychology of Violence. 2016 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 313-322.
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Problem-Focused Coping Mediates the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Mental Health among Chinese Women. / Wong, Janet Yuen Ha; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak; Choi, Anna Wai Man; Tiwari, Agnes; Chan, Ko Ling; Logan, T. K.

In: Psychology of Violence, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.04.2016, p. 313-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Our study focused on understanding on the ways that abused Chinese women cope and aimed to examine the mediating role of coping strategies between the relationships of intimate partner violence (IPV; including partner stalking) and mental health problems. Method: A population-based household survey was completed by 550 Chinese community-dwelling women. Data on the mediating roles of coping strategies were examined using structural equation models. Results: The prevalence of IPV among Chinese women was 22.9% for psychological abuse, 6.5% for physical abuse, 2.2% for sexual abuse, and 4.2% for partner stalking in the past year. Abused women used more active coping (p = .01), planning (p = .006), and self-distraction (p = .02) than nonabused women. Results supported the mediating effect of problem-focused and passive coping strategies, but not emotion-focused coping, in the pathways of IPV and mental health outcomes (root mean squared error of approximation = .063, comparative fit index = .93, Tucker-Lewis index = .91, and standardized root mean squared residual = .06). Negative mental health outcomes significantly decreased by problem-focused coping (β =-5.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] =-9.56,-.77, p = .021) and significantly increased by passive coping (β = 4.72, 95% CI = 1.24, 8.19, p = .008). Conclusions: Abused women used multifaceted types of coping. Both problem-focused and passive coping mediated the IPV-mental health outcomes link. The findings reinforced the importance of helping abused women find practical ways to cope with IPV.

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