Profiling bacterial community in upper respiratory tracts

Hana Yi, DongEun Yong, Kyungwon Lee, Yong Joon Cho, Jongsik Chun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Infection by pathogenic viruses results in rapid epithelial damage and significantly impacts on the condition of the upper respiratory tract, thus the effects of viral infection may induce changes in microbiota. Thus, we aimed to define the healthy microbiota and the viral pathogen-affected microbiota in the upper respiratory tract. In addition, any association between the type of viral agent and the resultant microbiota profile was assessed. Methods: We analyzed the upper respiratory tract bacterial content of 57 healthy asymptomatic people (17 health-care workers and 40 community people) and 59 patients acutely infected with influenza, parainfluenza, rhino, respiratory syncytial, corona, adeno, or metapneumo viruses using culture-independent pyrosequencing. Results: The healthy subjects harbored primarily Streptococcus, whereas the patients showed an enrichment of Haemophilus or Moraxella. Quantifying the similarities between bacterial populations by using Fast UniFrac analysis indicated that bacterial profiles were apparently divisible into 6 oropharyngeal types in the tested subjects. The oropharyngeal types were not associated with the type of viruses, but were rather linked to the age of the subjects. Moraxella nonliquefaciens exhibited unprecedentedly high abundance in young subjects aged < 6 years. The genome of M. nonliquefaciens was found to encode various proteins that may play roles in pathogenesis. Conclusions: This study identified 6 oropharyngeal microbiome types. No virus-specific bacterial profile was discovered, but comparative analysis of healthy adults and patients identified a bacterium specific to young patients, M. nonliquefaciens.

Original languageEnglish
Article number583
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Microbiota
Respiratory System
Moraxella
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Haemophilus
Satellite Viruses
Paramyxoviridae Infections
Streptococcus
Human Influenza
Healthy Volunteers
Genome
Bacteria
Delivery of Health Care
Population
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Yi, Hana ; Yong, DongEun ; Lee, Kyungwon ; Cho, Yong Joon ; Chun, Jongsik. / Profiling bacterial community in upper respiratory tracts. In: BMC Infectious Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
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Profiling bacterial community in upper respiratory tracts. / Yi, Hana; Yong, DongEun; Lee, Kyungwon; Cho, Yong Joon; Chun, Jongsik.

In: BMC Infectious Diseases, Vol. 14, No. 1, 583, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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