Promising practices in coaching co-taught preservice clinical experiences

Toni S. Strieker, Woong Lim, David Rosengrant, Marcia Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 2010, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) called for colleges and universities to "turn teacher education upside down" (pg. 2) and focus on clinical experiences, rather than coursework. This charge resulted in major shifts in teacher education programs in the USA as colleges and universities forged new partnerships to create yearlong clinical experiences that included co-teaching and coaching. In 2018, the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) Commission on Clinical Experiences recognized and described the mutual benefits of expanding these partnerships between schools and universities to include various forms of collaboration, co-teaching and coaching. While these partnerships are increasing in number, little is known about the efficacy of the specific coaching approaches and practices employed in the co-taught classroom. This self-study examined the communication and behavioral approaches of 13 co-teaching coaches who collaborated with 39 teacher candidates enrolled in yearlong, co-taught P-12 clinical experiences. The co-teaching coaches attended up to four sessions of professional learning on co-teaching and coaching. Basic statistics were used to determine the demographics, the content of the coaching conversations, and preferred coaching approaches. The main data sources were the coaches’ resumes, their reflections on goal-setting sessions, observation reports, and surveys on their daily coaching activities. Results indicated that effective coaches engaged in collaborative dialogue that moved candidates to self-directed learning. Similarly, these results described the pedagogical practices of effective coaches in terms of goal-setting with the candidates, basic mentoring, and demonstration teaching.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-30
Number of pages22
JournalAthens Journal of Education
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Professor of Reading, Kennesaw State University, USA. †Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education, University of New Mexico, USA. ‡Associate Professor of STEM Education, University of South Florida – St. Petersburg, USA. Part-time Assistant Professor, Kennesaw State University, USA. 1The first author and researcher presented the findings at the 20th Annual International Conference on Education of the Athens Institute for Education and Research in Athens, Greece on May 21, 2018. At the time of this conference, Drs. Toni Strieker and David Rosengrant are coaching 1st and 2nd year teachers whose induction is funded by the Woodrow Wilson Georgia Teaching Fellowship, a private foundation in Washington, D.C. committed to preparing high quality STEM teachers to work in America’s high-poverty high schools

Funding Information:
Funds to support this research were received from two partnership teacher education grants, including the following: * The Woodrow Wilson Georgia Teaching Fellowship program (2014-2018), a partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey, USA. * Kennesaw State University &the Cobb County School District Teacher Quality Partnership Grant, US Department of Education (2009-2015), Grant Award Number U3365090070. 1The first author and researcher presented the findings at the 20th Annual International Conference on Education of the Athens Institute for Education and Research in Athens, Greece on May 21, 2018. At the time of this conference, Drs. Toni Strieker and David Rosengrant are coaching 1st and 2nd year teachers whose induction is funded by the Woodrow Wilson Georgia Teaching Fellowship, a private foundation in Washington, D.C. committed to preparing high quality STEM teachers to work in America?s high-poverty high schools.

Funding Information:
Implementation of GROW beyond pre-service education. As a result of the successful utilization of the GROW document with our pre-service teachers, we have been able to implement it with a select group of our graduates. In 2014, the university described above was awarded funding for a Woodrow Wilson Georgia Teacher Fellowship Program for STEM education. In addition to completely revamping the Masters of Arts in Teaching preparation program, we needed to critically examine our support for our graduates during their induction into teaching.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, Athens Institute for Education and Research. All rights reserved.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

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