Promotion and Persistence of HIV Testing and HIV/AIDS Knowledge: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial in Ethiopia

Hyuncheol Bryant Kim, Beliyou Haile, Taewha Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use data from a randomized controlled trial in Ethiopia and examine the causal effects of HIV/AIDS education, home-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT), and conditional cash transfers (CCT) for facility-based VCT on HIV/AIDS knowledge and demand for HIV testing. HIV/AIDS education significantly increases HIV/AIDS knowledge but has a limited effect on testing take-up. However, when HIV/AIDS education is combined with either home-based VCT or CCT for facility-based VCT, take-up increases substantially by about 63 and 57 percentage points, respectively. We also demonstrate evidence of persistence in test-taking behavior, where past HIV testing does not dampen demand for testing. Lastly, we find suggestive evidence that home-based VCT could be more effective at detecting HIV-positive cases relative to CCT for facility-based VCT. Our findings highlight the importance of geographic accessibility in the testing decision and persistence in demand for HIV testing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1394-1411
Number of pages18
JournalHealth Economics (United Kingdom)
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Nov

Fingerprint

Ethiopia
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Randomized Controlled Trials
HIV
Counseling
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

@article{0f0f19e8ac40492a8d9d3f4b13068301,
title = "Promotion and Persistence of HIV Testing and HIV/AIDS Knowledge: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial in Ethiopia",
abstract = "We use data from a randomized controlled trial in Ethiopia and examine the causal effects of HIV/AIDS education, home-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT), and conditional cash transfers (CCT) for facility-based VCT on HIV/AIDS knowledge and demand for HIV testing. HIV/AIDS education significantly increases HIV/AIDS knowledge but has a limited effect on testing take-up. However, when HIV/AIDS education is combined with either home-based VCT or CCT for facility-based VCT, take-up increases substantially by about 63 and 57 percentage points, respectively. We also demonstrate evidence of persistence in test-taking behavior, where past HIV testing does not dampen demand for testing. Lastly, we find suggestive evidence that home-based VCT could be more effective at detecting HIV-positive cases relative to CCT for facility-based VCT. Our findings highlight the importance of geographic accessibility in the testing decision and persistence in demand for HIV testing.",
author = "Kim, {Hyuncheol Bryant} and Beliyou Haile and Taewha Lee",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1002/hec.3425",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "1394--1411",
journal = "Health Economics",
issn = "1057-9230",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "11",

}

Promotion and Persistence of HIV Testing and HIV/AIDS Knowledge : Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial in Ethiopia. / Kim, Hyuncheol Bryant; Haile, Beliyou; Lee, Taewha.

In: Health Economics (United Kingdom), Vol. 26, No. 11, 11.2017, p. 1394-1411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Promotion and Persistence of HIV Testing and HIV/AIDS Knowledge

T2 - Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial in Ethiopia

AU - Kim, Hyuncheol Bryant

AU - Haile, Beliyou

AU - Lee, Taewha

PY - 2017/11

Y1 - 2017/11

N2 - We use data from a randomized controlled trial in Ethiopia and examine the causal effects of HIV/AIDS education, home-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT), and conditional cash transfers (CCT) for facility-based VCT on HIV/AIDS knowledge and demand for HIV testing. HIV/AIDS education significantly increases HIV/AIDS knowledge but has a limited effect on testing take-up. However, when HIV/AIDS education is combined with either home-based VCT or CCT for facility-based VCT, take-up increases substantially by about 63 and 57 percentage points, respectively. We also demonstrate evidence of persistence in test-taking behavior, where past HIV testing does not dampen demand for testing. Lastly, we find suggestive evidence that home-based VCT could be more effective at detecting HIV-positive cases relative to CCT for facility-based VCT. Our findings highlight the importance of geographic accessibility in the testing decision and persistence in demand for HIV testing.

AB - We use data from a randomized controlled trial in Ethiopia and examine the causal effects of HIV/AIDS education, home-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT), and conditional cash transfers (CCT) for facility-based VCT on HIV/AIDS knowledge and demand for HIV testing. HIV/AIDS education significantly increases HIV/AIDS knowledge but has a limited effect on testing take-up. However, when HIV/AIDS education is combined with either home-based VCT or CCT for facility-based VCT, take-up increases substantially by about 63 and 57 percentage points, respectively. We also demonstrate evidence of persistence in test-taking behavior, where past HIV testing does not dampen demand for testing. Lastly, we find suggestive evidence that home-based VCT could be more effective at detecting HIV-positive cases relative to CCT for facility-based VCT. Our findings highlight the importance of geographic accessibility in the testing decision and persistence in demand for HIV testing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84992458892&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84992458892&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/hec.3425

DO - 10.1002/hec.3425

M3 - Article

C2 - 27671119

AN - SCOPUS:84992458892

VL - 26

SP - 1394

EP - 1411

JO - Health Economics

JF - Health Economics

SN - 1057-9230

IS - 11

ER -