Protection and preservation of vascular cells and tissues by green tea polyphenols

Dong Wook Han, Suong Hyu Hyon, Jongchul Park

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Green tea polyphenols (GTPs) are well known as functional foods with variousbioactivities. Conventional studies have typically focused on antioxidant, anticancer,anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects of GTPs. Para-hydroxyl, catechol and galloylgroups of catechins are mainly responsible for these biological activities. A newpromising field in polyphenols research is the study on the use of GTPs for non-frozenpreservation of mammalian cells and tissues. This chapter therefore concentrates on thebeneficial cardiovascular effects of GTPs, especially on those aspects related to theprotection and preservation of vascular cells and tissues. In the first part, we give anoverview of the antioxidant activity of GTPs in protection of endothelial cells (ECs) andblood vessels from reactive oxygen species-induced injury. We then discuss the antiproliferativeactivity of GTPs to prevent abnormal growth and migration of vascularsmooth muscle cells (VSMCs) that are involved in vascular diseases, includingatherosclerosis and re-stenosis after angioplasty. We finally argue in favor of thepotential usability of GTPs in the preservation of vascular tissues under physiologicalconditions. Pre-treatment with GTPs can indeed protect human ECs and saphenous vein against oxidative stress. Treatment with epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), a majorpolyphenolic constituent of green tea, also results in significant inhibition of attachment,proliferation and migration as well as cell-cycle arrest in serum-stimulated VSMCs.Moreover, these behaviors of VSMCs are effectively suppressed onto EGCG-releasingbiodegradable polymers that might be applied for the development of an EGCG-elutingvascular stent. Furthermore, GTP-pretreated veins can be preserved in a non-frozen statefor at least 2 wk, maintaining their vascular cell viability and vasculature without anystructural alterations. Therefore, GTPs may be usefully exploited to establish strategiesfor the protection and preservation of ECs and vascular tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPolyphenols and Health
Subtitle of host publicationNew and Recent Advances
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages87-111
Number of pages25
ISBN (Print)9781604563498
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Polyphenols
Tea
Blood Vessels
Tissue
Cells
Endothelial cells
Muscle Cells
Muscle
Endothelial Cells
Antioxidants
Tissue Preservation
Functional Food
Stents
Oxidative stress
Catechin
Saphenous Vein
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Bioactivity
Vascular Diseases
Angioplasty

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Han, D. W., Hyon, S. H., & Park, J. (2008). Protection and preservation of vascular cells and tissues by green tea polyphenols. In Polyphenols and Health: New and Recent Advances (pp. 87-111). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..
Han, Dong Wook ; Hyon, Suong Hyu ; Park, Jongchul. / Protection and preservation of vascular cells and tissues by green tea polyphenols. Polyphenols and Health: New and Recent Advances. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2008. pp. 87-111
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Han, DW, Hyon, SH & Park, J 2008, Protection and preservation of vascular cells and tissues by green tea polyphenols. in Polyphenols and Health: New and Recent Advances. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 87-111.

Protection and preservation of vascular cells and tissues by green tea polyphenols. / Han, Dong Wook; Hyon, Suong Hyu; Park, Jongchul.

Polyphenols and Health: New and Recent Advances. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2008. p. 87-111.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Han DW, Hyon SH, Park J. Protection and preservation of vascular cells and tissues by green tea polyphenols. In Polyphenols and Health: New and Recent Advances. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2008. p. 87-111