Psychiatric correlates of bullying in the United States: Findings from a National sample

Michael G. Vaughn, Qiang Fu, Kimberly Bender, Matt Delisi, Kevin M. Beaver, Brian E. Perron, Matthew O. Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the psychiatric correlates of bullying behavior in the United States. Data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative sample of US adults. Structured psychiatric interviews (N = 43,093) were completed by trained lay interviewers between 2001 and 2002. Six percent of US adults reported a lifetime history of bullying others. Respondents who were men, 18 to 34, Asian/Native American, earned ≤$35,000 annually, were born in the US, and received no college education had significantly higher rates of bullying. Multivariate logistic regression analyses identified significant associations between bullying and bipolar disorder, lifetime alcohol and marijuana use disorders, nicotine dependence, conduct disorder, antisocial, paranoid, and histrionic personality disorders, and family history of antisocial behavior. Prevention and treatment targeting bullying behaviors, comorbid conditions, and their precursors could potentially reduce the prevalence and consequences of bullying.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-195
Number of pages13
JournalPsychiatric Quarterly
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1

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Bullying
Psychiatry
Paranoid Personality Disorder
Histrionic Personality Disorder
Alcohols
Interviews
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Conduct Disorder
Tobacco Use Disorder
Asian Americans
North American Indians
Cannabis
Bipolar Disorder
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Vaughn, Michael G. ; Fu, Qiang ; Bender, Kimberly ; Delisi, Matt ; Beaver, Kevin M. ; Perron, Brian E. ; Howard, Matthew O. / Psychiatric correlates of bullying in the United States : Findings from a National sample. In: Psychiatric Quarterly. 2010 ; Vol. 81, No. 3. pp. 183-195.
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Vaughn, MG, Fu, Q, Bender, K, Delisi, M, Beaver, KM, Perron, BE & Howard, MO 2010, 'Psychiatric correlates of bullying in the United States: Findings from a National sample', Psychiatric Quarterly, vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 183-195. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11126-010-9128-0

Psychiatric correlates of bullying in the United States : Findings from a National sample. / Vaughn, Michael G.; Fu, Qiang; Bender, Kimberly; Delisi, Matt; Beaver, Kevin M.; Perron, Brian E.; Howard, Matthew O.

In: Psychiatric Quarterly, Vol. 81, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 183-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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