Psychosocial risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the lower-back among long-haul international female flight attendants

Hyeonkyeong Lee, Joellen Wilbur, Mi Ja Kim, Arlene M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Title. Psychosocial risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the lower-back among long-haul international female flight attendants Aim. This paper is a report of a study to examine the relationships between work-related psychosocial factors and lower-back work-related musculoskeletal disorders among long-haul international female flight attendants. Background. Recent attention has focused on the influence of work-related psychosocial factors on work-related musculoskeletal disorders. To date, however, little is known about the influence of psychosocial factors at work on lower back work-related musculoskeletal disorders in female flight attendants. Method. A cross-sectional, mailed survey was conducted in 2004 with flight attendants in one major airline who were randomly selected from a union membership list. The work-related psychosocial factors included psychological job demand, decision latitude, social support, job insecurity, and external environmental concerns. Physical load was defined by overall strenuousness across 41 job tasks and measured by a 4-point scale of strenuousness. Lower-back work-related musculoskeletal disorders were defined as lower-back symptoms that occurred at least once a month or lasted at least 1 week in the past year and caused at least moderate pain. Findings. The flight attendants with lower back work-related musculoskeletal disorders, compared with those without lower-back work-related musculoskeletal disorders, had higher perceived psychological job demands, job insecurity, and physical load. After controlling for physical load and personal factors, high job insecurity significantly increased the risk for lower-back work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusion. Occupational health nurses in the airline industry should be cognizant of the importance of assessing the influence of both job tasks and work-related psychosocial factors on lower-back work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)492-502
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume61
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 1

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Psychology
Occupational Health
Social Support
Industry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Nurses
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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Psychosocial risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the lower-back among long-haul international female flight attendants. / Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Wilbur, Joellen; Kim, Mi Ja; Miller, Arlene M.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 61, No. 5, 01.03.2008, p. 492-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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