Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea

A focus group study

Mi Ja Kim, Hyeonkyeong Lee, Hyun Kyung Kim, Yang Heui Ahn, Euisook Kim, Soon Nyoung Yun, Kwang Ja Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. Objectives: To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Design: Focus group. Settings: Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Participants: Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Methods: Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Results: Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. Conclusions: The quality characteristics of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources identified in this first systematic evaluation of the quality of nursing doctoral education can inform nursing schools, universities, and policy-makers about areas for improvement in Korea and possibly in the world. Geographical variations found in these four components of doctoral education warrant attention by policy-makers in Korea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-306
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studies
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Nursing Education
Korea
Focus Groups
Curriculum
Students
Administrative Personnel
Research
Nursing
Nursing Theory
Committee Membership
Nursing Schools
Research Ethics
Financial Support
Workload
Teaching
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Kim, Mi Ja ; Lee, Hyeonkyeong ; Kim, Hyun Kyung ; Ahn, Yang Heui ; Kim, Euisook ; Yun, Soon Nyoung ; Lee, Kwang Ja. / Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea : A focus group study. In: International Journal of Nursing Studies. 2010 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 295-306.
@article{cdd51161021b420bb4dea86eb0a39767,
title = "Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea: A focus group study",
abstract = "Background: The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. Objectives: To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Design: Focus group. Settings: Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Participants: Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Methods: Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Results: Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. Conclusions: The quality characteristics of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources identified in this first systematic evaluation of the quality of nursing doctoral education can inform nursing schools, universities, and policy-makers about areas for improvement in Korea and possibly in the world. Geographical variations found in these four components of doctoral education warrant attention by policy-makers in Korea.",
author = "Kim, {Mi Ja} and Hyeonkyeong Lee and Kim, {Hyun Kyung} and Ahn, {Yang Heui} and Euisook Kim and Yun, {Soon Nyoung} and Lee, {Kwang Ja}",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2009.07.005",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "295--306",
journal = "International Journal of Nursing Studies",
issn = "0020-7489",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea : A focus group study. / Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yang Heui; Kim, Euisook; Yun, Soon Nyoung; Lee, Kwang Ja.

In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 47, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 295-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea

T2 - A focus group study

AU - Kim, Mi Ja

AU - Lee, Hyeonkyeong

AU - Kim, Hyun Kyung

AU - Ahn, Yang Heui

AU - Kim, Euisook

AU - Yun, Soon Nyoung

AU - Lee, Kwang Ja

PY - 2010/3/1

Y1 - 2010/3/1

N2 - Background: The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. Objectives: To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Design: Focus group. Settings: Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Participants: Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Methods: Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Results: Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. Conclusions: The quality characteristics of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources identified in this first systematic evaluation of the quality of nursing doctoral education can inform nursing schools, universities, and policy-makers about areas for improvement in Korea and possibly in the world. Geographical variations found in these four components of doctoral education warrant attention by policy-makers in Korea.

AB - Background: The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. Objectives: To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Design: Focus group. Settings: Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Participants: Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Methods: Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Results: Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. Conclusions: The quality characteristics of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources identified in this first systematic evaluation of the quality of nursing doctoral education can inform nursing schools, universities, and policy-makers about areas for improvement in Korea and possibly in the world. Geographical variations found in these four components of doctoral education warrant attention by policy-makers in Korea.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=76249133463&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=76249133463&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2009.07.005

DO - 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2009.07.005

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 295

EP - 306

JO - International Journal of Nursing Studies

JF - International Journal of Nursing Studies

SN - 0020-7489

IS - 3

ER -