Quality-of-Life (QOL) Marketing

Proposed Antecedents and Consequences

Dongjin Lee, M. Joseph Sirgy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article builds on a program of research in quality-of-life (QOL) marketing by reviewing the research literature dealing with this construct and proposing a set of antecedents and consequences of that construct. QOL marketing is defined as marketing practice designed to enhance the well-being of customers while preserving the well-being of the firm's other stakeholders. The authors refer to the dimension pertaining to the enhancement of customer well-being as the beneficence component of QOL marketing, while the preservation of the well-being of the firm's other stakeholders is referred to as the nonmaleficence component. The authors propose that the consequences of marketing beneficence and nonmaleficence are high levels of customer well-being, customer trust and commitment, and positive corporate image and company goodwill. They also propose that the beneficent and nonmaleficent components of QOL marketing are influenced by a set of environmental factors, organizational factors, and individual factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-58
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Macromarketing
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Quality of life
Well-being
Marketing
Stakeholders
Organizational factors
Customer trust
Goodwill
Individual factors
Corporate image
Customer commitment
Environmental factors
Reviewing
Marketing practices
Enhancement

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Marketing

Cite this

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Quality-of-Life (QOL) Marketing : Proposed Antecedents and Consequences. / Lee, Dongjin; Sirgy, M. Joseph.

In: Journal of Macromarketing, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 44-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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