Quantification of injury burden using multiple data sources: a longitudinal study

Keith T.S. Tung, Frederick K. Ho, Wilfred H.S. Wong, Rosa S. Wong, Matthew S.H. Tsui, Paul Ho, Chak Wah Kam, Esther W.Y. Chan, Gilberto K.K. Leung, Ko Ling Chan, Chun Bong Chow, Patrick Ip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Quantification of injury burden is vital for injury prevention, as it provides a guide for setting policies and priorities. This study generated a set of Hong Kong specific disability weights (DWs) derived from patient experiences and hospital records. Patients were recruited from the Accident and Emergency Department (AED) of three major trauma centers in Hong Kong between September 2014 and December 2015 and subsequently interviewed with a focus on health-related quality of life at most three times over a 12-month period. These patient-reported data were then used for estimation of DWs. The burden of injury was determined using the mortality and inpatient data from 2001 to 2012 and then compared with those reported in the UK Burden of Injury (UKBOI) and global burden of diseases (GBD) studies. There were 22,856 mortality cases and 817,953 morbidity cases caused by injuries, in total contributing to 1,027,641 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in the 12-year study timeframe. Estimates for DALYs per 100,000 in Hong Kong amounted to 1192, compared with 2924 in UKBOI and 3459 in GBD. Our findings support the use of multiple data sources including patient-reported data and hospital records for estimation of injury burden.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3078
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Health & Medical Research Fund (Ref.: 11121401).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s).

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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