Racial harassment and job satisfaction in South Africa: the moderating effects of career orientations and managerial rank

Sebastian Stoermer, Azusa Hitotsuyanagi-Hansel, Fabian Jintae Froese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Employee job satisfaction is a strong predictor of pivotal individual and organizational outcomes, e.g. commitment, productivity, retention. This study examines the mediating role of workplace racial harassment in the association of employee racioethnicity and job satisfaction in the South African context. Furthermore, this study investigates the moderating effects of career-related variables, i.e. career orientations and managerial rank. Results of a survey of 154 employees in South Africa indicate that black South Africans experience more workplace racial harassment than white employees and thus show lower job satisfaction. Moreover, the detrimental effects of workplace racial harassment on job satisfaction are more pronounced among highly career-oriented individuals and/or among employees with no or low managerial rank. The implications of these findings for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)385-404
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb 4

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Job satisfaction
Personnel
Productivity
Career orientation
Harassment
Employees
Moderating effect
South Africa
Work place
Africa

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

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Racial harassment and job satisfaction in South Africa : the moderating effects of career orientations and managerial rank. / Stoermer, Sebastian; Hitotsuyanagi-Hansel, Azusa; Froese, Fabian Jintae.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 30, No. 3, 04.02.2019, p. 385-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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