Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT

effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

Haesung Yoon, Myung Joon Kim, Choon Sik Yoon, Jiin Choi, Hyun Joo Shin, Hyun Gi Kim, MiJung Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. Objective: To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1–17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student’s t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Results: Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. Conclusion: In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-344
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Radiology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Thorax
Radiation
Pediatrics
Weights and Measures
Noise
Control Groups
Ionizing Radiation
Artifacts
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Yoon, Haesung ; Kim, Myung Joon ; Yoon, Choon Sik ; Choi, Jiin ; Shin, Hyun Joo ; Kim, Hyun Gi ; Lee, MiJung. / Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT : effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children. In: Pediatric Radiology. 2015 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 337-344.
@article{d34b50dc40434e5cbffb9c9eb496a841,
title = "Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children",
abstract = "Background: New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. Objective: To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50{\%} adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1–17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student’s t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Results: Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57{\%} dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5{\%}) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. Conclusion: In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57{\%} mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique.",
author = "Haesung Yoon and Kim, {Myung Joon} and Yoon, {Choon Sik} and Jiin Choi and Shin, {Hyun Joo} and Kim, {Hyun Gi} and MiJung Lee",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00247-014-3176-9",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "337--344",
journal = "Pediatric Radiology",
issn = "0301-0449",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT : effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children. / Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung Joon; Yoon, Choon Sik; Choi, Jiin; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, MiJung.

In: Pediatric Radiology, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.03.2015, p. 337-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT

T2 - effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

AU - Yoon, Haesung

AU - Kim, Myung Joon

AU - Yoon, Choon Sik

AU - Choi, Jiin

AU - Shin, Hyun Joo

AU - Kim, Hyun Gi

AU - Lee, MiJung

PY - 2015/3/1

Y1 - 2015/3/1

N2 - Background: New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. Objective: To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1–17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student’s t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Results: Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. Conclusion: In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique.

AB - Background: New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. Objective: To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1–17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student’s t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Results: Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. Conclusion: In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84939885368&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84939885368&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00247-014-3176-9

DO - 10.1007/s00247-014-3176-9

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 337

EP - 344

JO - Pediatric Radiology

JF - Pediatric Radiology

SN - 0301-0449

IS - 3

ER -